Difference, Identity, and Power—The US From 1800-2000

History 285D

Fall 2014
Instructor: 
Location: 
3205 DWINELLE
Day & Time: 
W 10-12P
CCN: 
39954
Units: 
4
This seminar will allow students to pursue research projects in US History in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The guiding emphases are threefold and interrelated: (1) the development and impact of specific  forms of difference (i.e., race, gender, sexuality, class, place/region); (2) how these differences come to be expressed as identities; and (3) the role of power in these various, at times overlapping, histories of difference and identity formation. I anticipate that research topics will range across social, intellectual, political, and cultural history. Interdisciplinary and research projects are encouraged. As an integral part of the seminar, we will discuss selected interpretive, theoretical, and methodological issues generated by a limited number of core readings, in part to be designed by the participants.
Note: James W. Cook, et. al., eds., The Cultural Turn in US History, will be a principal core reading.