Transnational Latin America

History 103E.003

Fall 2011
Section: 
Instructor: 
Instructor (text): 
Location: 
204 Wheeler
Day & Time: 
M 12-2
CCN: 
Units: 
Units
<p>Stephanie Ballenger received her Ph.D. in Latin American History from UC Berkeley. Her research interests encompass the intersection of medicine and religion in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, cross-cultural and transnational approaches to health and the politics of health, history and cultures of medicine and the body, and the relationship between the modernization of medical knowledge and the formation of modern national and cultural identities.</p>

NOTE: this section is currently full. If you are interested in this class please see notes above. Scholars have recently embraced a turn towards "transnationalism" as a framework or set of theoretical and methodological approaches for understanding Latin America as a distinct world region. This reading seminar will provide students with an opportunity to evaluate the promises and possibilities of the "transnational turn" through careful reading of recent scholarship in comparison to some classic works in the field. The course will consider a variety of topics including environmental issues, the Cold War, the drug trade, border politics, religion, economic development, the persistence of social inequality in the region, the persistence of regional identities and loyalties, forms of political activism and the "failures" of radical politics in the context of neoliberalism. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is necessary for this course. Students will be asked to write two short papers on the assigned readings, and one longer paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Students planning to take a 101 seminar in the spring will also have the option of creating a detailed thesis prospectus as their final project. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is necessary for this course. Students will be asked to write two short papers on the assigned readings, and one longer paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Students planning to take a 101 seminar in the spring will also have the option of creating a detailed thesis prospectus as their final project. Note about the books for this section: Students should purchase eleven of the fourteen books that have been ordered for this course as follows: For week 4 (meeting of September 19) students should purchase EITHER Evans, Romancing the Maya OR Aguirre, Informal Empire. For week 6 (meeting of October 3) students should purchase EITHER Tota, The Seduction of Brazil OR Neptune, Caliban and the Yankees. For week 9 (meeting of October 24) students should purchase EITHER Gobat, Confronting the American Dream OR Weber, Visions of Solidarity.