Africa

103H.001 Fall 2017 Making Africa Muslim

In this course, we will ask how and why Islam was adopted by so many people in Africa (slightly less than 50% of Africans are Muslims today). Although we will pay some attention to the larger history of the spread of Islam in Africa, we will be primarily interested in issues of religious practice and identity among different strata of African populations over time. One of the principle vehicles for the extension of Muslim practice in Africa was the teachings and institutional structures embodied in Islamic mysticism (which is known by the term "Sufism").

280H.001 Spring 2017 Topics in African History

This is a survey seminar that introduces students to key themes and literature of the Africa field from the precolonial to the postcolonial periods.

285H/280H Fall 2016 Visions of Africa: Inventing and Documenting a Continent

This course serves two separate purposes. The first (280H) is a broad and critical survey of the production of knowledge on Africa. We will explore the varied ways in which Africa has been conceptualized and represented from antiquity to the present. A range of theoretical, historical, ethnographic, travel, fictional, autobiographical, colonial, and post-colonial writings will be used in the 280H component of the class.

280H Spring 2016 Africa in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

This introductory seminar investigates major themes and historiographic debates of African history from about 1800 to the end of the twentieth century. It begins with an exploration of the making and transformation of 19th century communities. Some of the topics in this section include processes of political formation and administration; social-cultural organization; production, commerce and accumulation; Western exploration, conquest and the missionary factor.

24 Fall 2015 Endangered Children And Youth In Contemporary Africa: Documentaries

Scheduled to meet for the first half of the semester only, this once a week two hour seminar will analyze documentaries that explore and expose the endangerment of children and youth in contemporary Africa. Documentaries on child trafficking and enslavement, child brides, child laborers, street children and youth, victims of FGM, child soldiers, HIV/AIDS orphans and urban youth gangs will be viewed in class. The goal of the seminar is to examine the complex local, regional, and at times global factors behind the extensive abuse and endangerment of children and youth in Africa.

10 Fall 2015 African History

Combining a chronological and thematic approach, this course will examine select themes of African history from the 16th Century to the present. The first four weeks of the semester will be devoted to pre-colonial Africa. The rest of the semester will focus on the colonial and post-colonial periods. Among the topics that the course will explore are: Images of Africa in Western scholarship; pre-colonial social and political organization; economic production and pre-colonial trade. Colonialism was a brief but very intensive interlude in the long history of Africa.

280H Spring 2015 Advanced Studies In African History: Decolonization And Nationalism In Post 1945 Africa

The transfer of power from European colonizers to African leaders was a “tangled and controversial” process. In some colonies it was done in a precipitate haste while in others like Angola, Mozambique, Algeria, Namibia, Kenya and Guinea Bissau, decolonization was preceded by protracted armed struggles. This seminar will focus on the diverse dynamics which shaped the nationalist and decolonization processes in Africa.

103H Spring 2015 Child Labor in Africa: A Historical Perspective

A recent study indicates that 48 million African children, or one third of all children under 14 years of age, are "economically active".  The range of children's work extends beyond the purely economic and includes military service and sex slavery. Emerging within specific socio-cultural, economic, religious and political contexts riddled with extreme poverty, and a hostile global environment, child labor in Africa is a complex phenomenon that defies simple analysis or solution.

[node:field_103_year] Child Labor in Africa: A Historical Perspective

A recent study indicates that 48 million African children, or one third of all children under 14 years of age, are "economically active".  The range of children's work extends beyond the purely economic and includes military service and sex slavery. Emerging within specific socio-cultural, economic, religious and political contexts riddled with extreme poverty, and a hostile global environment, child labor in Africa is a complex phenomenon that defies simple analysis or solution.

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