Ancient

103A.002 Fall 2011 Sparta: Mirages and Realities

NOTE: this section is currently full. If you are interested in this class please see notes above. Sparta and the evolution of its unusual (and in some cases bizarre) political, cultural, social, and economic institutions is the focus of this undergraduate proseminar: its intense militarism, its system of helotage or serfdom, the heightened status for female Spartiates, its unusual retention of kingship, the demographic decline of the Spartiates, its deprecation of coinage, and its desperate efforts to regain power in the Hellenistic period.

280A/285A Spring 2011 Intro to Byzantine History

This seminar will offer both a general introduction to and an investigation of special topics within Byzantine studies. The weekly seminar discussions will be organized as follows: weeks 1-9 covered the period from the 7th until the 15th centuries in chronological sequence. Students will be expected to become familiar with the sequence of events in Byzantine history through reading G.

280A.002 Fall 2010 Topics in Antiquity: Slavery and the Economy in the Roman Empire

This course will focus on recent scholarly debates regarding the practices of slavery in the Roman empire as part of debates of demography and the ancient economy. In addition, we will consider other forms of un-free labor and recent scholarly assessments of the role of the poor in the later empire. At issue will be a variety of methodological approaches to the phenomenon of slaver: in addition to those regarding the economy we will also examine literary critical and comparative anthropological approaches to Roman slavery.

106B Spring 2010 The Roman Empire

An introduction to the history of the Roman empire, from the reign of the first emperor, Augustus (31 BC­AD 14), to the end of the 4th century AD. Major themes include the changing configurations of power in the Roman empire (institutional, personal, social, religious), the unity and diversity of Roman imperial culture, the relationship between state and

185A Spring 2010 History of Christianity

The course deals with the origins of Christianity and the first eleven centuries of its expansion into a major institutional, social, and intellectual force shaping Western Europe. The central themes are the mechanisms and conditions shaping this expansion, rather than a chronological account in order to present this process as a model of institutionalization of religious movements. The emphasis will be on patterns of crisis and reform; i.e., on conflicts arising within the church itself and as a result of its dealings with the ";outside"; world, and how these crises were resolved.

106B Summer 2010 The Roman Empire

An introduction to the history of the Roman empire, from the reign of the first emperor, Augustus (31 BC­AD 14), to the end of the 4th century AD. Major themes include the changing configurations of power in the Roman empire (institutional, personal, social, religious), the unity and diversity of Roman imperial culture, the relationship between state and

101.13 Spring 2010 Research Topics in Ancient Greek and Roman History

This course is open to all students intending to write a thesis on any topic in ancient Greek and Roman history. Class meetings in the first couple of weeks will explore different models of research and writing in ancient history. Students will then pursue a research topic of their own choosing, in consultation with the instructor. Subsequent meetings will allow students to share their work with one another, and will facilitate the process of rethinking, rewriting, and finishing on time.

280A/285A Fall 2010 Politics and Religion in the Greek World

This seminar will explore the relationship between religious practice and political power in the Greek world. Our examination will embrace multiple political contexts, including polis, koinon, empire, and (time and interest allowing) monarchy. The most developed approach to this issue is the polis religion model, which holds that religious practice in the Greek world was almost exclusively organized by and mediated through the polis. But this leaves many questions unanswered. Was it always so? How did religious practice relate to the process of state formation?

280A.002 Spring 2009 Greek Economies: The Documentary Evidence

In recent years, the ancient economy has emerged as a particularly vibrant field of study, its dynamism and energy deriving both from methodological advances and discoveries of new empirical evidence. Much of this new evidence has come to us in the form of inscriptions. This course will accordingly introduce participants to the economic activities of the ancient Greek world through a focused study of the epigraphic evidence.

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