Britain

280C Fall 2014 The Renaissance before the Secular

This course offers an introduction to Renaissance and early modern studies, focusing on debates about secularism as they pertain to four topics: the state, the human, literature, and society. We will read works by Dante, Luther, and Savonarola, Las Casas, Petrarch, Machiavelli, Milton, Lucy Hutchinson, Ann Halkett, and Giambattista Vico. The course will be co-taught by a historian and literary scholar and the methodological differences between these approaches will be one of the main topics of the seminar.

N151C Summer 2014 The Peculiar Modernity of Britain - Session D

For many years Britain was seen as the crucible of the modern world. This small, cold and wet island was thought to have been the first to develop representative politics, the idea of the individual, the nuclear family, capitalism and an industrial economy, a bureaucratic state, rapid transportation, mass cities, mass culture and, of course, an empire upon which the sun famously never set.

101.003 Spring 2014 Anything on Imperial Britain

This class is primarily designed for students who have made Britain or its empire their area of concentration. Class meetings will focus on the process of research and writing. Early readings will explore different models of research and writing and introduce students to the research materials available to them on campus. I am open to students writing on any subject so long as they have a good question and a set of archival sources that will help them answer it.

103C.002 Fall 2013 Self, Identity, and the Individual in British History

This course is intended to provide a broad overview of the historical development of the modern subject, using Britain as its case study. What do we mean when we say “the modern individual”? How can something like “me” or “ourselves” mean different things in different time periods, and in different contexts? Rather than seeing this as a singular, linear development, we will look at a collection of processes that made up the modern individual.

151C Spring 2013 The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1750 to the present

For many years Britain was seen as the crucible of the modern world. This small, cold and wet island was thought to have been the first to develop representative politics, an industrial economy, sustained and rapid population growth, the nuclear family, rapid transport, mass cities, mass culture and, of course, an empire upon which the sun famously never set.

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