Britain

152A Fall 2011 Ireland Since the Union

Following an introductory section on Ireland from the English conquest (1691) through the 18th century, this course studies Irish history from the Union with Great Britain (1800) to the end of the Northern Troubles in the first years of the 20th century.

103C.002 Fall 2011 The British Empire

NOTE: this section is currently full. If you are interested in this class please see notes above. At its greatest extent the British Empire consisted of roughly one quarter of the world's land and people. Yet, neither was it culturally homogenous nor was it governed by a uniform set of political theories or practices. How, then, did such a small island come to exercise control over such a large extent of the globe? And, if the British Empire developed in such a haphazard or (as some historians have said) "absent-minded" way, how was it held together? How and when did it end?

101.016 Spring 2011 Research Seminar in British History

This is a seminar for history majors wishing to write a thesis on any aspect of British history from the middle ages through the twentieth century. The course will have no formal content but rather will focus on the process of research and writing, so students are strongly advised to have a potential thesis topic in mind and to discuss it with me before the beginning of the semester. I am open to students writing on any subject so long as they have a good question and a set of sources that will help them answer it.

151C Spring 2010 A Peculiar Modernity: Imperial Britain, 1848-2000

For many years Britain was seen as the crucible of the modern world. This small, cold and wet island was thought to have been the first to develop representative politics, an industrial economy, rapid transport, mass cities, mass culture and, of course, an empire upon which the sun famously never set. And yet, despite this precocious modernity, imperial Britain remained a deeply traditional society unable to rid itself of ancient institutions like the monarchy, the aristocracy and the established church.

101.15 Spring 2010 Anything on Modern Imperial Britain

This class is primarily designed for students who have made Britain or its empire their area of concentration. Class meetings will focus on the process of research and writing. Early readings will explore different models of research and writing and introduce students to the research materials available to them on campus. I am open to students writing on any subject so long as they have a good question and a set of archival sources that will help them answer it.

275C.001 Fall 2009 Britain and the Making of the Modern World

This course will examine why Britain's history was long seen as a model for how the modern world was made. It will, accordingly, focus on familiar historical processes: the creation of national state structures, the emergence of representative politics, the industrial revolution, imperial expansion, secularization, urbanization and the invention of modern cultural institutions. It will ask when, where and how Britain became modern.

103C.002 Fall 2009 The British Empire

At its greatest extent the British Empire consisted of roughly one quarter of the worldâ€_Äôs land and people. Yet, neither was it culturally homogenous nor was it governed by a uniform set of political theories or practices. How, then, did such a small island come to exercise control over such a large extent of the globe? And, if the British Empire developed in such a haphazard or (as some historians have said) ";absent-minded"; way, how was it held together? How and when did it end? What was its lasting impact on Britain and the world?

101.014 Spring 2009 Anything on Modern Imperial Britain

This class is primarily designed for students who have made Britain or its empire their area of concentration. Class meetings will focus on the process of research and writing. Early readings will explore different models of research and writing and introduce students to the research materials available to them on campus. I am open to students writing on any subject so long as they have a good question and a set of archival sources that will help them answer it.

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