Comparative

39P Spring 2014 Sex, Sexuality and Society

This course will explore, in historical perspective, why and how the nature of sexual difference, the control of reproduction, and the policing and regulation of sexual desires, practices and pleasures have loomed so large in the organization of society and culture.

160 Spring 2014 The International Economy of the 20th Century

History 160 is an upper division course that traces the tremendous pace and scope of economic change since the late 1800s. The twentieth century saw unprecedented levels of international economic integration through market-based exchange as well as numerous experiments, left and right, at economic independence from reigning financial superpowers.

104 Spring 2014 The Craft of History

History 104 is a course designed for history majors, or prospective majors, to master the skills necessary to succeed in their chosen discipline and to enhance their understanding of the nature of historical inquiry.   By taking this course, you will improve your ability to meet the challenges of upper level history courses and prepare yourself for the advanced r

101.020 Spring 2014 The Writers Group

This section is designed for seniors with well-conceived thesis projects that do not fit within the rubrics of other 101 seminars. Members of the group will observe a common schedule in developing, drafting, and critiquing material but will not share a common subject area. Admission requires a written statement and the consent of the instructor.

103U.003 Spring 2014 Precursors of Modern Nationalism

This course will explore both the origins of modern nationalism as a global phenomenon and its historical precursors. We will begin by examining theories proposed by historians of Europe and elsewhere to explain the rise of nationalism. We will then examine (and critique) scholarship describing nation-like phenomena in the pre-modern world. Requirements: diligent reading of all assigned texts, active class participation, weekly short papers or presentations, and brief written assignments in preparation for a final paper.

103U.002 Spring 2014 The Cold War

Each week, this reading seminar will focus on a particular Cold War episode such as the Alger Hiss case, Khrushchev’s “secret speech”, the Hungarian uprising of 1956, the “Cambridge Five” spy ring, Indonesia’s failed Communist coup of 1965, the Vietnam War’s Tet Offensive, the reign of the Khmers Rouges in Cambodia, and others. We will examine these episodes with an eye toward investigating two things.

101.002 Fall 2013 The Writers Group

This section is designed for seniors with well-conceived thesis projects that do not fit within the rubrics of other 101 seminars. Members of the group will observe a common schedule in developing, drafting, and critiquing material but will not share a common subject area. Admission requires a written statement and the consent of the instructor.

103U.004 Fall 2013 Global Environmental History

This is a reading seminar designed to introduce students to current problems and methods in environmental history. For quite some time, environmental history meant primarily the study of environmentalism and conservation in the United States. More recent work has expanded the field to include questions about colonialism, built landscape, and other topics that seem quite distant to matters of parks and game preserves.

103U.003 Fall 2013 Using Material Culture in History

In a world that is ever more visually oriented, historians tend to use more and more images.  But the meanings originally attached to images seen now are usually not transparently obvious, even a few years after their production.  This course aims to teach undergraduates interested in any field of history (including art history and archaeology) how to investigate, query, and deploy images in a convincing manner in reasoned arguments.

103U.002 Fall 2013 Slavery and Freedom in the Atlantic World

Slavery and the slave trade transformed the Atlantic into a complex zone of interaction uniting North and South America, Europe, and Africa in the wake of Columbus’s famous voyage.  Between 1500 and 1820 more than three out of four immigrants to the Americas were Africans. The goods that flowed through the region were in large part produced by enslaved peoples, sent to meet the demands of societies supported by slavery, or purchased with earnings on slave-produced products.

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