Comparative

C188A Fall 2013 Art and Science

In this course we explore the intersections of art and science in medieval, modern, and contemporary history. Our aim is twofold. First, to explore the close interaction between these two fields, and the way in which they have shaped each other through the ages. Second, to focus our attention on specific instances of art/science interaction, using them as prisms through which one can reach a fuller understanding of major historical transformations.

C191 Fall 2013 Death, Dying, and Modern Medicine: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

This course is jointly offered by a physician and a historian. We will discuss contemporary questions of policy and practice: medical definitions of death; the "right to die;" how we die, and how we say we want to die; the role of the hospital and hospice; the functions of the state in mediating between various views about the end of life; the role of doctors, family and others at the end of life, for example.

C187 Fall 2013 The History and Practice of Human Rights

What are human rights? Where did they originate and when? Who retains them, and when are we obliged to defend them? Though what kinds of institutions, practices, and frameworks have they been advocated and affirmed. And which are the human rights that we take to be self-evident? The rights to speak and worship freely? To legal process? To shelter and nourishment? Do our human rights include high-speed Internet access, as one Scandinavian country has recently proposed? Can human rights ever be global in scope?

2 Fall 2013 Comparative World History: "Foodways: A Global History"

We’ve all got to eat—but there, the consensus ends. Long before celebrity chefs, food TV, and the organic movement competed for our attention, food and the meanings attached to it were the subjects of controversy. Poets and painters, philosophers and bureaucrats, merchants and prophets explored why we eat what we eat and how we define, acquire, and consume food.

2 Spring 2013 Foodways: A Global History

We’ve all got to eat—but there, the consensus ends. Long before celebrity chefs, food TV, and the organic movement competed for our attention, food and the meanings attached to it were the subjects of controversy. Poets and painters, philosophers and bureaucrats, merchants and prophets explored why we eat what we eat and how we define, acquire, and consume food.

R1B.002 Spring 2013 Reading and Composition in History-War and Revolution in Asia

This is a reading and composition seminar that examines the profound changes in modern Asian societies. We will read primary sources (such as private letters and memoirs), secondary histories and fiction. All of these sources have shaped our understanding of the dramatic and violent twentieth century. Major themes we will explore include the impact of Western imperialism, causes and consequences of violent struggle and the ambiguous legacies of independence. Countries covered include the Philippines, China, Japan, Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam.

R1B.004 Spring 2013 Reading and Composition in History-"Decolonization and the Twentieth-Century World"

During the Twentieth Century the vast overseas empires of the European powers were replaced by a world of nation-states, dominated by the dual superpowers of the USA and USSR. However, the process of decolonization did not mean simply the end of empire, but involved the remaking of the world in very specific and contingent ways. These included both the formation of new modes of global power and political economy, and the persistence of imperial power structures into the postcolonial world.

R1B.003 Spring 2013 Reading and Composition in History- A History Of Terrorism: From the French Revolution to Osama Bin Laden

Terror has proved a fixation for the last decade in American politics. We will delve beneath the contemporary media glare to unearth the origins of global terrorism as a political tool and an ideological representation.

285U.001 Spring 2013 Research Workshop with an Emphasis on Institutions of Culture and Structures of Cultural Exchange

This is a workshop course on cultural history. All are welcome. But I invite especially projects that examine the institutional infrastructure for the making, transformation, and exchange of knowledge,  art, technology, or ethical norms: printing and publishing; education; translation; travel; museums and concert halls; law and intellectual property, for example.

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