Comparative

280U/285U Fall 2011 Workshop in Cultural History

This seminar will allow students from to pursue any research topic that engages methodological and theoretical problems that we all encounter in the practice of writing cultural history broadly conceived. It will begin with several weeks of common readings. We then move into workshop mode. I offer step-by- step guidance through the process of identifying, researching, and presenting a manageable research project.

280U/285U Fall 2011 Histories of the British Empire

This course will explore the historical development and nature of the modern British empire. At its height in 1919 that empire stretched over a quarter of the globe and included almost a third of its population with a staggering 458 million people spread across 13m square miles.

101.002 Fall 2011 The Writers’ Group

This section is designed for seniors with well-conceived thesis projects that do not fit within the rubrics of other 101 seminars. Members of the group will observe a common schedule in developing, drafting, and critiquing material but will not share a common subject area. Admission requires a written statement and the consent of the instructor.

101.007 Spring 2011 The Writers Group

This section is designed for seniors with well-conceived thesis projects that do not fit within the rubrics of other 101 seminars. Members of the group will observe a common schedule in developing, drafting, and critiquing material but will not share a common subject area. Admission requires a written statement and the consent of the instructor.

103U.002 Fall 2011 Losing the Farm: 20th Century Agriculture in a Global Context

Recent debates regarding food and farming have tended to turn on the question of industrialization. Some have argued that there are few things more nefarious than industrial agriculture, while others have countered that it has allowed us to feed the world cheaply and efficiently. In this course, we will excavate the history of these debates by examining how agriculture has changed in the twentieth century. Given the reliance of twentieth-century agriculture on international trade networks, this course will be both transnational and comparative in its geographical scope.

2 Spring 2010 Comparative World History: World Cities

This course introduces students to the history of four major urban areas (from at least three continents) in particular time periods. The goal is to expose students to a broad range of city types, metropolitan cultures, and scholarly approaches to urban experience, while encouraging them to think about connections, similarities, and differences among the cities we are studying. This spring we will be focusing on Florence, on Edo/Tokyo, on New York, and on Rio de Janeiro.

103U.002 Fall 2010 Losing the Farm: 20th Century Agricultural History in a Global Context

Recent debates regarding food and farming have tended to turn
on the question of industrialisation. Some have argued that there are few things more nefarious than industrial agriculture, while others have countered that it has allowed
us to feed the world cheaply and efficiently. In this course, we will excavate the history of these debates by examining how agriculture has changed in the twentieth century. Given the reliance of twentieth-century agriculture on international trade networks, this course will be both transnational and comparative in its geographical scope. We

101.004 Fall 2010 Writerâ€_Äôs Workshop

This course will serve to guide you through the capstone experience of your undergraduate history education: the researching and writing of your senior thesis. Successful completion of this challenging, but rewarding, endeavor requires you to do the work of a historian. Ultimately, this translates to producing a piece of scholarship â€_Ä" in this case a 30-50 page final paper â€_Ä" in which you articulate and defend a historical interpretation/argument rooted in extensive primary source research and informed by thorough secondary source reading.

103U.002 Spring 2010 Comparative Colonialism: Africa and Asia in the Twentieth Century

During the twentieth century the nature of colonialism evolved in order to respond to economic, political, and social processes originating African and Asia, as well as Europe. This course, through weekly readings and discussions intends to chronologically and thematically analyze what colonialism was, how it varied according to location, theory, and practice, as well as appraise its legacy in the post-colonial world. Weekly readings will include both theory and secondary literature that will explore debates central to histories of modern Asia, Africa, and European Empire.

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