Medieval

103B.004 Spring 2017 Crime and Punishment in Medieval Europe

Governments and communities during the middle ages dealt with crime and punishment very differently than we do. Many actions we think of as crimes they did not (e.g., some homicides). Many actions they thought of as crimes we do not (e.g., homosexuality). Many punishments we think of as cruel and barbaric were regarded as normal and beneficial (mutilation). Many actions we seek to deter by the threat of punishment they sought to remedy without any punishments at all (often homicide).

285B.006 Fall 2016 The Discourses and Practices of Peace in the Middle Ages

The point of departure for this class is the Peace of God, the movement between 989 and 1040 that may have been Europe's first great millenarian movement – or not; that may have been the first great popular movement in European history – or not; that may have been at the origins of French and Italian communes and the German Landfrieden; that may have been a crucial turning point in European political discourses – or may have been nothing of the sort.

280B.006 Fall 2016 The Discourses and Practices of Peace in the Middle Ages

The point of departure for this class is the Peace of God, the movement between 989 and 1040 that may have been Europe's first great millenarian movement – or not; that may have been the first great popular movement in European history – or not; that may have been at the origins of French and Italian communes and the German Landfrieden; that may have been a crucial turning point in European political discourses – or may have been nothing of the sort.

149B Fall 2016 Medieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350)

The history of medieval Italy is one of vivid contrasts: of beauty and brutality, freedom and tyranny, piety and blasphemy. The great poet of the Inferno summons us to consider such contrasts in nearly every canto: how can such stunningly beautiful language conjure images of such horrendous violence? This course explores the world that produced Dante, Giotto, and Saint Francis.

101.005 Spring 2016 The Middle Ages

To accommodate the interests of all those majors whose Field of Concentration in History in the Medieval World, this 101 will not focus on a single theme. Students will work with the guidance of the instructor to formulate research projects that are feasible, interesting, and most likely to produce an acceptable thesis. Given the challenges of medieval source material, good projects will focus on substantive sources. Students are strongly encouraged to contact the instructor before the term starts to begin finding possible sources and defining feasible topics.

280B/285B Spring 2016 The Medieval Episcopate in Italy and Beyond: Sources and Studies

This seminar is designed as an introduction to the wide variety of historical sources produced by bishops from roughly the fifth to the fifteenth centuries as well as to the ways historians have used them to explore the medieval past. Among the sources we may consider are letters, wills and tombs, liturgical ordines and vestments, charters and registers, visitation records, hagiographical (vitae, miracle collections) and other biographical sources: the Roman Liber pontificalis and its echoes in episcopal gesta, sagas, etc.

103B.005 Fall 2015 “God Wills It!”: Five Centuries of Crusade

Holy War: was it defensive or colonial, pious or piratical, millenarian or mundane, or all of the above? From the origins of the armed pilgrimage, to the capture (and loss) of Jerusalem and of Constantinople, to the Reconquest of Spain, to the destruction of heretics in southern France and of pagans in northern Lithuania, we will consider the many faces of Crusade and the crusading movement.

177A Fall 2015 Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages

This survey course will cover close to three millennia of Armenian history, from the process of ethnogenesis to the almost complete destruction of the Armenian "feudal" system by the end of the fifteenth century. Much as this course is based on the broad framework of Armenian political history and institutions (kingship, nakharar system, the church, etc.), it also emphasizes economic development, social change, and cultural transformations. We will reflect upon a number of themes.

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