Science

285S.001 Spring 2006 The Scientific Revolution

The problematic Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century enjoys the
richest historiography of any period in the history of science. The purpose
of the course is to master this historiography, compare it with primary
sources, examine the propriety of metaphorical labels for historical periods
(Dark Ages, Renaissance, Enlightenment...), and estimate the utility and
vitality of ";The Scientific Revolution"; as an analytical concept.";

275S.001 Fall 2006 Introduction to the History of Science

The course calls for intensive readings of secondary sources in the history of Western natural philosophy, from the Greeks through Newton. It is especially useful for students preparing for the graduate examination in this field.

103S.003 Fall 2006 The Theory of Evolution: History and Interpretation

The 1859 publication of On the origin of species can be seen as one of the most significant scientific landmarks of modern times, with implications reaching into a variety of scientific and social arenas. In this course, we'll look at the history of the theory of evolution by natural selection, and we'll also examine some of the ways that it has been interpreted and applied in the last century and a half.

275S.001 Spring 2006 Introduction to the History of Science

An introduction to issues and problems in the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century science based on reading, discussion, and written analysis of selected secondary literature. General themes include the organization of science in different national settings, the nature of the scientific community, patterns of scientific change, science and gender, and the relations of science to technology, industry, medicine, government, and warfare. Requirements include several short papers.

101.005 Spring 2006 Scientific Change: Motives and Conflicts through the Ages

For the research paper, students will be asked to select a significant turning point in the history of science and technology in the Western world in any time period for which primary source material exists. They will be encouraged to explore the different factors -technical and cultural- that stimulated change, and the controversies they engendered. Students should consult with the instructor before signing up if they have unanswered questions.

275S.001 Fall 2005 Introduction to the History of Science

The course calls for intensive readings of secondary sources in the history of Western natural philosophy, from the Greeks through Newton. It is especially useful for students preparing for the graduate examination in this field.

280S.001 Fall 2005 American Science

American science is a Johnny-come-lately. Historically, it was long in a position of backwardness. Historiographically, it has remained relatively unself-conscious. And yet the American way of doing science has become a global model. Its historians may not have kept up. This seminar serves as both an introduction to the field and a consciousness-raising exercise. It looks for ways in which historians of U.S.

30A Fall 2005 The Origins of Modern Science

This course will cover the period through the era of Newton. An introductory overview of the development of scientific concepts in the West to the end of the 17th century. Emphasis will be on the establishment of a worldview among the ancient Greeks, its incorporation into a Judeo-Christian framework, and the transformations ushered in by the Scientific Revolution. The course will consist of two lectures per week, supplemented by films, and two separate hours of discussion.

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