Science

290 Fall 2015 History Colloquium

This is a 1-credit S/U graduate course in history of science, accompanying the CSTMS Colloquium. The meetings consist of invited lectures by leading researchers in the field of history of science and science studies, followed by an extended session of questions and answers (the calendar will be available on the CSTMS website in August: http://cstms.berkeley.edu). Additionally, students will meet the speakers in informal roundtable discussions ("master classes").

280S Fall 2015 The Darwinian Revolution

Two scientific concepts – more than others – have radically reconfigured humanity's place in the natural world: Galileo Galilei's heliocentrism and Charles Darwin's natural selection. Darwin's theory of evolution remains pervasive in modern thought and has become a frequent flashpoint for religious controversy. This seminar will provide a chronological analysis of the development of evolutionary theories from 1800 until 1950.

138 Fall 2015 History of Science in the U.S

The course covers the history of science in the U.S. from the colonial period up to the present. We will be focusing on the unique situation of the sciences within the changing U.S. context, emphasizing debates over the place of science in intellectual, cultural, religious, and political life. As we examine the mutual shaping of national experience and scientific developments, we will also trace the emergence of institutions for the pursuit of scientific knowledge, with special attention to the relationships between science and technology and between science and the state.

138T Fall 2015 History of Science in the U.S. CalTeach

The course covers the history of science in the U.S. from the colonial period up to the present. We will be focusing on the unique situation of the sciences within the changing U.S. context, emphasizing debates over the place of science in intellectual, cultural, religious, and political life. As we examine the mutual shaping of national experience and scientific developments, we will also trace the emergence of institutions for the pursuit of scientific knowledge, with special attention to the relationships between science and technology and between science and the state.

30 Fall 2015 Science and Society

Modern scientific thought arose from the chaotic encounters between European and non-European cultures during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. As a result, scientific knowledge has been a constant companion to each major event in modern world history. This course provides a survey of the history of science from the Late Middle Ages to present.

280S.003 Spring 2015 Data science - History, philosophy, sociology

This is a graduate reading seminar querying the intellectual,  institutional, and social bases of the rise of "data science,"  understood as a platform drawing from computer science, statistics, and  research domain questions around working with new or large sets and  streams of data. The seminar is directed to graduate students in the 

C182C Spring 2015 Science, Technology, and Society

Be it bugs, buildings, or bits, what humans imagine and construct is tightly interconnected with the societies they live in. This course provides an overview of the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) as a way to study how our knowledge and technology shape and are shaped by social, political, historical, economic, and other factors. We will learn key concepts of the field (e.g. how technologies are understood and used differently in different communities) and apply them to a wide range of topics including geography, history, environmental and information science, and others.

290 Spring 2015 Historical Colloquium

This is a 1-credit S/U graduate course in history of science, accompanying the history of science colloquium and the brownbag series. It meets every Thursday, 4-6 pm. Meetings consist of: invited lecture on a special topics, followed by an extended session of questions and answers; informal discussions over the work of affiliated scholars; and roundtable sessions on broader methodological issues in the history of science and technology. The course brings you up to the research front in these topics, interacting with historians on subjects that currently engage their scholarship.

280S.001 Spring 2015 Science and the Atlantic World, 1500-1850.

The discovery and colonization of the Americas radically changed the ways we understand the natural world. European mariners charted unexplored continents, colonial administrators learned about commercially-valuable flora from indigenous peoples, and an impressive volume of new objects flowed both ways across the Atlantic Oceans. This context of exploration, domination, and exchange framed – and perhaps caused – the scientific revolution. This seminar will provide entryway into the “Atlantic critique” in the history of science.

101.010 Spring 2015 Research Topics in the History of Science

Every society attempts to grasp the invisible systems underlying life, consciousness, and the cosmos, but in so doing unconsciously reveals its own intimate nature. Ostensibly a window looking out upon the natural world, science is equally a mirror of the society that produces it.

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