Science

290 Spring 2012 Historical Colloquium

This is a 1-credit S/U graduate course in history of science, accompanying the history of science colloquium and the brownbag series. It meets every Thursday, 4-6 pm. Meetings consist of: invited lecture on a special topics, followed by an extended session of questions and answers; informal discussions over the work of affiliated scholars; and roundtable sessions on broader methodological issues in the history of science and technology. The course brings you up to the research front in these topics, interacting with historians on subjects that currently engage their scholarship.

280S Spring 2012 Drugs in World History

The field of drug history allows us to learn about societies through their shifting relationships to pharmacological substances. In this seminar, we will focus on the multiple histories of major drugs including: Opium, Cocaine, Oral Contraceptives, Khat, Kola, and Viagra. We will trace stories of each substance across Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas using articles, historical texts, novels and films.

101.017 Spring 2012 Constructing Revolution in the History of Science and Technology

In discussing science and technology we often use the term ";revolutionary"; to express the impact of a certain invention, epoch, research result, or theory. Scholars, however, disagree on what constitutes revolution in the history of science and technology. Which theories yield radical discontinuity with previous scientific thought? What technological developments fundamentally change society? Is revolutionary change inherent to certain scientific and technological developments, or can ";revolution"; be constructed by the historian?

285S Spring 2011 Research Seminar: Modern Science

Research seminar on the history of science, 19th century to the present. All approaches and topics are fair game; one broad theme will be the ways science has been understood as a distinctively modern enterprise. Students in science studies fields are welcome but should be prepared to write a historical paper. Along with producing an original piece of research, students will be expected to critique each others' papers and to give a final presentation.

280S Fall 2011 Science and Late-Modern Empires

This seminar delves into the entanglements of science and late modern imperialism by drawing on recent literature in the field of history of science. The challenge is to explore simultaneously the role of imperial undertakings in the shaping of modern science and the relevance of history of science narratives for understanding the general history of late modern empires.

290 Fall 2011 Historical Colloquium: History of Science

This is a 1-credit S/U graduate course in history of science, accompanying the history of science colloquium and the brownbag series. It meets every Thursday, 4-6 pm. Meetings consist of: invited lecture on a special topics, followed by an extended session of questions and answers; informal discussions over the work of affiliated scholars; and roundtable sessions on broader methodological issues in the history of science and technology. The course brings you up to the research front in these topics, interacting with historians on subjects that currently engage their scholarship.

101.014 Spring 2011 History of Science and Technology

Science and technology are constitutive dimensions of our way of life. Think, for example, of the way in which scientific objectivity is routinely associated with fairness, impartiality, disinterested decision-making, and democracy. Or, think of the rapidly changing technological infrastructure of our social life. Only recently, however, have scholars started paying adequate attention to the close interaction between science, technology, and the rest of the social worlds we inhabit.

103S.002 Fall 2011 Science, Religion, and Magic in Early Modern Europe

NOTE: this section is currently full. If you are interested in this class please see notes above. The seminar studies the momentous transformation of knowledge that took place between the late sixteenth and the early eighteenth century, and which is usually described as the Scientific Revolution. During this period, the criteria for assessing what can count as sound evidence changed significantly, as did those to judge whether an argument is valid, or a belief credible.

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