Science

101.17 Spring 2010 Cutting-Edge Topics in the History of Medicine and Science

This seminar explores recent scholarship at the frontiers of medical and scientific history, as a means of understanding the choices historians make when producing essays and articles and providing a historiographical foundation as the class embarks on the researching, drafting, and polishing of the senior thesis. How do historians of science and medicine decide what precisely to write about? What informs their research methodologies, analytical perspectives, and writing techniques?

290.001 Fall 2009 Historical Colloquium: History of Science

1 unit, graded S/U. Meets together with the UCB-UCSF Colloquium in History of Science, Technology, and Medicine.

For details see http://ohst.berkeley.edu/ohst_events.html.

280S.001 Fall 2009 Drugs in World History

The field of drug history allows us to learn about societies through their shifting relationships to pharmacological substances. In this seminar, we will focus on the multiple histories of major drugs including: Opium, Cocaine, Oral Contraceptives, Khat, Kola, and Viagra.

275S.001 Fall 2009 Introduction to the History of Science

An introduction to issues and problems in the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century science based on reading, discussion, and written analysis of selected secondary literature. General themes include the organization of science in different national settings, the nature of the scientific community, patterns of scientific change, science and gender, and the relations of science to technology, industry, medicine, government, and warfare. Requirements include several short papers.

30A Fall 2009 The Origins of Modern Science

Modern science as we know it today is the product of a historical process. In this course we shall explore the emergence of its concepts, practices, goals, and cognitive authority by surveying its roots in their social and cultural setting. We shall trace the development of conceptions of the natural world from antiquity to the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, paying particular attention to the transformation of natural philosophy in Europe between the age of Leonardo da Vinci and that of Isaac Newton.

280S.001 Spring 2009 Scientific Objectivity

Scientific objectivity is a crucial notion in modern western societies, and one that has been associated with fairness, impartiality, disinterested decision-making, and democracy. In everyday parlance, science is objective when it describes things as they really are. Historical research, however, suggests that the very notion of scientific objectivity has gone through significant changes in the modern age, and it is best understood as the product of a historical process. In other words, judgments of objectivity depend upon local contexts of use.

275S.001 Spring 2009 Introduction to the History of Science (II)

An introduction to issues and problems in the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century science based on reading, discussion, and written analysis of selected secondary literature. General themes include the organization of science in different national settings, the nature of the scientific community, patterns of scientific change, science and gender, and the relations of science to technology, industry, medicine, government, and warfare. Requirements include several short papers.

103S.002 Fall 2009 Engineering the Twentieth Century

The twentieth century was a time of profound change in the relationship of man to the built environment, and in the ideas about what aspects of the world should be under human control and what aspects remained beyond it. In this course we will study engineers and engineering projects during the twentieth century from a variety of approaches. We will consider the changing scope of engineering, and the relationship between engineering projects and local culture and politics.

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