United States

103D.003 Fall 2016 Taxes and Politics (Proseminar in United States History)

Why are taxes so complicated? Are they as complicated as they seem? Who really pays them? Who doesn't? And, perhaps most important, how are these decisions made? What is the history of American income taxes, property taxes, payroll taxes, inheritance taxes, sales taxes, gasoline taxes, and the rest? And, most generally, what does the tax structure of a society tell us about it?

103D.002 Fall 2016 The Border (Proseminar in United States History)

According to one of its most eloquent students, the U.S. Mexican border is an open wound "where the third world grates against the first and bleeds." Today hundreds of millions of people cross the border every year, legally and illegally, along with hundreds of billions of dollars worth of goods. This seminar will explore the history of the border zone, both as an unsettled region where millions live and work, and as a uniquely unequal frontier that attracts money, power, bodies, and commodities from around the world.

100AC.001 Fall 2016 The History of Women in the United States before 1900

This course is a survey of the history of women in America from the pre-colonial period to the turn of the twentieth century.  It examines the significant cultural, economic, and political developments that shaped the lives of American women but places gender at the center of historical analysis.  The course also stresses the variety of women's experiences, acknowledging the importance of race, ethnicity, and class in shaping female lives.

131B Fall 2016 US Social History from Civil War to Present

Social history centers on the experiences of groupings of people, their ideas, values, and behaviors, and the impact of these on their interaction with each other as well as with the structures and systems—political, economic, and social—they lived in. This course considers US history from the Civil War to the present through the experiences of major populations in the United States that, until the relatively recent emergence of social history as a method of study, had been left out of the historical narrative.

285D Fall 2016 Research and Writing Seminar and Workshop in 20th Century United States History

In this graduate level research and writing seminar/workshop, students will conduct independent, archival (or, other primary source-based) research on a 20th century U.S. history topic, which will, in turn, serve as the empirical foundation for the completion of a primary source-based and secondary source-informed paper of journal article length.

280D.002 Fall 2016 African American History

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the history of African Americans in the United States, and to the main lines of scholarly thinking about those issues.

C139C Fall 2016 Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History

Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History presents a top-down (political and legal history), bottom-up (social and cultural history), and comparative (by race and ethnicity as well as region) view of America's struggles for racial equality from roughly World War II until the present.

124A Fall 2016 The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II

For individuals born at the end of the Civil War in 1865 and living through the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, their 76 years of life would have witnessed profound technological, social, and ideological change. Innovations such as the telephone, airplane, and automobile transformed American business and reoriented social life. As the power of businesses grew, factory workers and farmers responded with uneven success.

103D.005 Fall 2016 In Capitalism We Trust: American Business History from Cotton to Foreclosure (Proseminar in United States History)

When President Calvin Coolidge declared in 1925 that “the chief business of the American people is business,” he was not making a historical argument, though it would have been a defensible one. Nearly a century earlier, French visitor, Alexis de Tocqueville, made a similar observation. Indeed, America was colonized by joint-stock corporations! Understanding the history of American capitalism therefore unlocks a great deal about America itself. How did capital become capitalism and how did capitalism affected Americans’ lives?

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