United States

7B Summer 2008 The United States Since the Civil War

History 7B will present the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War up to the present. We will cover the era of Reconstruction, the legacy of slavery, the rise of industrialization, the U.S. becoming a world power, the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War, and, time permitting, the War in Iraq. While we will deal with political, economic and military history, the primary focus of the class will be on cultural history.

285D.002 Fall 2008 American Modernity Revisited

This research seminar explores the making and unmaking of American modernity, with particular emphasis on law, culture, and politics. Students will be guided through the process of framing, researching, and writing an article-length paper on a topic of their choice (to be developed in consultation with the instructor). In the first few weeks of the semester we will orient ourselves in the article genre, chiefly by reading and critiquing some of the most innovative and influential article-length scholarship in the fields of legal, cultural, and political history.

285D.001 Fall 2008 Immigration and Ethnicity in the United States

This seminar will invite students to conduct research on some topic of immigration to and ethnicity in the United States. Issues that might be the basis for research include patterns of migration and migration networks; ethnicization, pluralism, and assimilation; immigration law; gender, immigration, and ethnicity; nativism and inter-ethnic conflict; and religion and ethnicity. The first few weeks of the seminar will include common reading and discussion of a variety of approaches to the study of immigration and ethnicity.

285D.002 Spring 2008 Politics, Economics, and Race

This seminar is for students who want to write seminar papers about politics, economics, and/or race in U.S. history. Potential topics can center on government institutions, electoral politics, economic development, political cultures, and even ideological or intellectual questions with significant political implications. Studies can be national, local, or in between (i.e., about those pesky states). 19th-century topics are preferred, but not absolutely necessary; 18th- and 20th-century topics are also possible.

285D.001 Spring 2008 Private Lives and the Public Realm

We will examine how matters relating to the private sphere have been connected to public life and how they have been invested with significance as having important public consequences. Among the subjects that students may consider researching are, among others, family relations, child life, sexuality, religion, vice, psychology and psychopathology.

280D.002 Fall 2008 U.S. Politics

Politics in an election year. Don't you think? It's been almost 20 years since leading political historians complained at great length about what, for them, was a novel sense of marginalization (and they did whine quite a bit). This seminar is for graduate students interested in reading more and less recent literature about the political history of the United States. We will examine some of the major historiographical turns and try to figure out the current state of play -- institutionalism? political economy? Something else?

275D.001 Fall 2008 Introduction to the Literature of American History (to the Civil War)

This course introduces graduate students to classic and current texts in early American history. Course requirements include in-class presentations, abstracts, reviews, and review essays about the assigned readings.

280D.001 Fall 2008 U.S. Cultural and Intellectual Life in its International Dimensions

This course explores the transnational contexts of United States cultural and intellectual history. Among the topics to be considered are the role of empire in shaping U.S. culture and institutions; immigration as a factor changing cultural and intellectual life; efforts within the U.S.

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