United States

103D.002 Fall 2015 Sexing the Body: Medical and Scientific Conceptions of Gender and Sexuality

This seminar will examine how physicians and scientists have sought to explain sex, gender, and sexuality. We will focus on how their concepts of the human body have shaped definitions of masculinity, femininity, and sexual identity over time. Throughout the course, we will use specific examples and case studies to highlight the relationship among medicine, science, and their cultural context.

103D.003 Fall 2015 Love, Sex and Marriage in U.S. History

Though shaped by human biology and evolutionary impulses, human sexual and romantic relations have varied widely and changed dramatically.  This course explores aspects of that diversity and change in the social, cultural, and legal history of the United States between the American Revolution and the Second World War.  Most of our work will consist of intensive seminar discussion of recent scholarly work in the history of marriage and sexuality.

285D Fall 2015 America since 1900

This research seminar is for students working on American history since 1900. This is not a reading seminar. We will spend some time discussing critical elements of the historian's craft (formulating topics; mapping out research programs; situating one's work within the historiography; designing, writing, and re-writing article length essays; etc.). But from very early in the semester the seminar will be devoted to the drafting, production, and refinement of seminar papers. 

280D Fall 2015 African American Legal History

This seminar explores scholarship about African Americans’ encounter with law. It looks at how debates over the place of African Americans in a democratic society have shaped important aspects of state and federal law. And it explores the impact of law on the lives of African Americans.

285D Fall 2015 America to 1900

This research seminar is for students working on American history prior to 1900. This is not a reading seminar. We will spend some time discussing critical elements of the historian's craft (formulating topics; mapping out research programs; situating one's work within the historiography; designing, writing, and re-writing article length essays; etc.). But from very early in the semester the seminar will be devoted to the drafting, production, and refinement of seminar papers. 

275D Fall 2015 Survey-US/North American History Since 1607

A rapid immersion class, this is the orientation course for entering graduate students intending to study the history of North America, whether as a first or second field. Graduate students from all fields are welcome. A reading intensive class, 275D surveys the state of most of the key fields of North American History and introduces students to Berkeley’s North Americanist faculty, each of whom will visit the class for a face-to-face discussion of their work and respective field/s of research.

280D Fall 2015 Readings in Slavery, History, and Law

The seminar addresses the history of slavery and of the law of enslavement, primarily in mainland North America but also in comparative perspective. Our emphasis will be on slavery as a labor system, but we will also examine slavery as a social condition, and the laws that applied in both respects. We will attempt to understand slavery’s North American origins, its legal and moral justifications, its expansion, its politics, its demise, and its aftermath.

280D Fall 2015 From the New Deal to the New Gilded Age

This graduate reading seminar will examine cutting edge United States historiography on political economy (and, in many instances, its intersections with race and gender). Taken together, this scholarship traces an arc of United States history that runs from New Deal liberalism, racial and gender liberalism, and the “great compression” of income distribution in the middle third of the twentieth century to New Right conservatism, New Gilded Age “neoliberalism,” and the “great divergence” of income distribution in the last third of the twentieth century.

131B Fall 2015 US Social History from Civil War to Present

This course provides an introduction to American social and labor history from the Civil War to the present day.  It will focus on the experiences of ordinary people, addressing various aspects of how American life changed during this period. We will stress inclusion and exclusion from participation in American political and economic life. Major themes include the creation and destruction of a mass middle class, the establishment of a welfare state and the subsequent political backlash that it provoked, and the reconstitution of gender norms and race relations.

100D Fall 2015 Crime, Punishment, and Power in US History

This upper division lecture course explores the history of the modern American criminal justice system and the people who have shaped and been shaped by its colossal, life-altering powers. We begin by examining three distinct spaces in which new ideas about crime, policing, race, and punishment were articulated and given material force after the American Revolution: the prison, the city, and the slave plantation.

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