Graduate Courses

Fall 2015
Africa
285H/280H: Topics In the History of Africa: Decolonization And Nationalism In Post 1945 Africa

The transfer of power from European colonizers to African leaders was a “tangled and controversial” process. In some colonies it was done in a precipitate haste while in others like Angola, Mozambique, Algeria, Namibia, Kenya and Guinea Bissau, decolonization was preceded by protracted armed struggles. This seminar will focus on the diverse dynamics which shaped the nationalist and decolonization processes in Africa. Differences in colonial systems, the nature of African political consciousness and mobilization, the role of the elite, peasantry, youth, gender, ethnicity, race, religion, economic rationalization/ pragmatism, imperial revisionism and devolution of empire, and international pressure among other topics will be discussed in an effort to explain the end of empire in Africa.

Tabitha Kanogo
2231 DWINELLE
Th 10-12
CCN: 40215
Asia
275F: Japan

We shall read and discuss genuinely excellent English-language monographs on Japanese history from the classical period through the early modern (or Edo) period. The canon, as it were. The top hits, old and new, that deserve (and reward) careful attention. Selections will be influenced by the research interests of the group and comparative material (outside the Japan field) will be introduced as appropriate. All welcome (auditors, visitors, old and new friends), as long as you read the work resourcefully and are ready for searching conversation. Selective attendance by auditors is fine. Requirements include weekly reading notes and two historiographical essays.

Mary Elizabeth Berry
2303 DWINELLE
Th 3-6P
CCN: 40079
280F: Advanced Studies in Asian History
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Peter B. Zinoman
3104 DWINELLE
W 12-2P
CCN: 40140
280F: Modern China
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Alexander C. Cook
3205 DWINELLE
W 10-12P
CCN: 40143
280F: Caste, Culture, Religion: The Anthro-History of South Asia
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Janaki Bakhle
3205 DWINELLE
Tu 2-5P
CCN: 40134
285F: Southeast Asia
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Peter B. Zinoman
3104 DWINELLE
W 12-2P
CCN: 40212
Ancient
280A: Property and Power in the Ancient Greek World
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Emily Mackil
2231 DWINELLE
W 2-5
CCN: 40089
280A/285A: Advanced Studies in Ancient History

On Wealth.  As exemplified by the publication of Peter Brown's Through the Eye of a Needle, questions relating to the conceptualization and treatment of poverty and the poor in a Christianized later Roman Empire have been of considerable importance in recent scholarship.  A closer look -- for example at the subtitle fo Brown's work -- makes it clear that wealth rather than poverty lies at the heart of these issues.  Phrased differently, since most of our sources were written by persons who possessed things, who were in fact wealthy, both in relative and absolute terms, at stake was not so much the issue of how to be Christian and poor, but how to be Christian and wealthy.  How should wealth be managed and distributed in a Christian imperial context?  What did it mean to be Christian and wealthy -- given that wealth included obligations with regard to governance, both in one's own household and within the empire, for example through the administration of justice, but also through engagement in military affairs?  Who were the poor to whom wealth should be distributed and who made those decisions?  Who owned the churches?  How should wealth be appropriately displayed?  Such questions were of particular concern to bishops, but not only to them:  every member of the Christian Roman elite, male and female, was confronted with the issue of "Christian" wealth management.  We will focus on the anonymous treaty On Wealth, the anonymous writing On Military Problems, and on the Salvian of Marseilles' To the Church and On the Government of God, augmented by works of Ambrose and Augustine, to address such questions, taking our cues from Peter Brown's magnum opus.

 

Susanna Elm
2231 DWINELLE
Thursdays 2-5
CCN: 40092
285A: Research Seminar in Ancient History
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Susanna Elm
2303 DWINELLE
F 2-5
CCN: 40182
Europe
275B: The Middle Ages

An introduction to the historiography of medieval Europe, emphasizing breadth of coverage and targeted to basic frames of knowledge. The course is therefore geared to those whose first, second, or outside field is medieval history. Readings include works on early and later medieval Christianity, Christianization, monasticism, and heresy; social and economic history; political and institutional history (Merovingians, Carolingians, France, England); and literacy and popular culture. Special attention is also given to ways one can read books and take notes productively. Requirements: 1) periodic class presentations; 2) two short written assignments on individual readings modelled on book reviews; 3) a longer essay applying core readings to a small set of supplementary readings chosen by the student.

Geoffrey Koziol
2303 DWINELLE
Tu 3-6P
CCN: 40059
275B: Survey-Europe
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Thomas W. Laqueur
3104 DWINELLE
Tu 3-6P
CCN: 40056
280B: Introduction to Soviet Historiography

The landmarks of Soviet historiography from Leon Trotsky to the latest academic fad, in loose chronological order. Weekly book reviews, no papers.

Yuri Slezkine
3401 DWINELLE
Wednesday 4-6P
CCN: 40098
280B: The Idea of Reason

This course will follow the fortunes of the idea of “reason” in the work of Kant, Hegel and Marx. We will also examine several 20th-century assessments of their legacy, including work by Frankfurt School theorists.

Martin E. Jay
3205 DWINELLE
Wednesdays 12-2p
CCN: 40095
280B: Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe: Microhistorical Approaches

This graduate seminar considers several topics in the study of European popular culture(s) during the long early modern period (14th-19th centuries), relying on the methodologies of microhistory.  In an age that increasingly values “Big History” and “The Long Duration,” this course focuses on a methodological approach widely practiced since the 1970s that seeks to make sense of discrete and unusual moments (often scandals or judicial trials) in the lives and activities of a single person or small group of people who have been marginalized in more traditional accounts of early modern European history.  Focusing on the lives, beliefs, and behaviors of (mostly) marginal people in peripheral places, microhistorians seek to uncover the everyday worlds of ordinary people in a society transformed by religious reformation, the rise of literacy, the growth of state power, and economic transformation.   After some preliminary reflections on microhistory and popular culture, we focus on four themes: gender, sexuality, and identity; religious heterodoxy; politics and rebellion; and translocal microhistory (involving movement across space and cultural boundaries).  Readings include classical works by Carlo Ginzburg, Natalie Zemon Davis, Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Michel de Certeau, and others, alongside methodological reflections on the question of scale in historical analysis. 

 
 
Peter Sahlins
2303 DWINELLE
W 12-2P
CCN: 40097
Latin America
280E: Advanced Studies in Latin American History
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
The Staff
TBD
TBD
CCN: 40128
Science
280S: Advanced Studies in the History of Science
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
The Staff
2303 DWINELLE
F 12-2P
CCN: 40161
290: History Colloquium
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Massimo Mazzotti
2231 DWINELLE
10-12P
CCN: 40224
United States
275D: Survey-US History
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Rebecca M. McLennan
3104 DWINELLE
Th 2-4P
CCN: 40068
280D: Readings in Slavery, History, and Law

The seminar addresses the history of slavery and of the law of enslavement, primarily in mainland North America but also in comparative perspective. Our emphasis will be on slavery as a labor system, but we will also examine slavery as a social condition, and the laws that applied in both respects. We will attempt to understand slavery’s North American origins, its legal and moral justifications, its expansion, its politics, its demise, and its aftermath. Our goal will be to achieve a thorough and complete grounding in the field’s formative literatures through reading and extended discussion.

C. L. Tomlins
102 2240 PIEDMNT
M 9-12P
CCN: 40127
280D: African American Legal History

This seminar explores scholarship about African Americans’ encounter with law. It looks at how debates over the place of African Americans in a democratic society have shaped important aspects of state and federal law. And it explores the impact of law on the lives of African Americans. We will put special emphasis on questions of citizenship and rights, exploring how struggles to define rights for African Americans helped give rise to new legal categories (such as the business corporation), new models of legal practice (most famously the variant of “cause lawyering” pioneered by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund), and modes of reasoning (such as “reasoning from race”). The readings will include a mix of “classic” and newer works in this field.

D. Penningroth
102 2240 PIEDMNT
Th 10-1P
CCN: 40437
280D: From the New Deal to the New Gilded Age

This graduate reading seminar will examine cutting edge United States historiography on political economy (and, in many instances, its intersections with race and gender). Taken together, this scholarship traces an arc of United States history that runs from New Deal liberalism, racial and gender liberalism, and the “great compression” of income distribution in the middle third of the twentieth century to New Right conservatism, New Gilded Age “neoliberalism,” and the “great divergence” of income distribution in the last third of the twentieth century. How have historians interpreted this period of American history (and the chapters within it), including the initial convergence (and relative success) of the pursuits of greater racial and economic equality and their subsequent divergence with economic inequality reverting to Gilded Age proportions? These are some of the questions this course will seek to answer.

Mark Brilliant
2303 DWINELLE
W 2-4P
CCN: 40116
285D: America since 1900

This research seminar is for students working on American history since 1900. This is not a reading seminar. We will spend some time discussing critical elements of the historian's craft (formulating topics; mapping out research programs; situating one's work within the historiography; designing, writing, and re-writing article length essays; etc.). But from very early in the semester the seminar will be devoted to the drafting, production, and refinement of seminar papers. 

Daniel Sargent
3104 DWINELLE
W 12-2
CCN: 40200
285D: America to 1900

<p>This research seminar is for students working on American history prior to 1900.&nbsp;This is not a reading seminar.&nbsp;We will spend some time discussing critical elements of the historian's craft (formulating topics; mapping out research programs; situating one's work within the historiography; designing, writing, and re-writing article length essays; etc.). But from very early in&nbsp;the&nbsp;semester the seminar will be devoted to the drafting, production, and refinement of seminar papers.&nbsp;</p>

Brian DeLay
2303 DWINELLE
F 2-5P
CCN: 40197
Research and Teaching Credit
375: Teaching History

History 300 is a brief introduction to the art of teaching, required of first-time GSIs in the Department of History.  It is open to graduate students from other departments with permission of the instructor.  As it is a 2-unit course, weekly assignments will be modest.  Your most important tasks in this course are therefore: 1. To participate vigorously in our discussions; and 2. To share your own experiences in the classroom during the semester so that we can learn from one another. You will also submit short writing assignments, most notably a syllabus on a topic you are likely to teach in the future. Ideally, this syllabus and the related assignments will become part of your permanent teaching portfolio, and may even serve as the basis for a course that you will propose to teach in this department in the future. Most readings will come from GSI Teaching & Resource Center’s Teaching Guide for GSIs: http://gsi.berkeley.edu/teachingguide/tghome.html. A few other reading assignments available on the Resources page of our bCourses web site, and you will occasionally be asked to upload documents to bCourses for your peers to read. Attendance and participation will be worth 50 % of the total grade. The syllabus will be worth 40% and the other assignments will be worth 10%.

Victoria Frede
100 WHEELER
M 2-4P
CCN: 40350
601: Individual Study for Master's Exam Margaret Chowning
100 WHEELER
M 2-4P
CCN: 40353
602: Individual Study for Doctoral Students Margaret Chowning
NO FACILITY
UNSCHED
CCN: 40356