101 Courses

101.011: Latin American and Inter-American historyNote new room.Louis Segal was born and raised in Berkeley. He has a MA and PhD in Latin American history from UC Davis. His area of specialization at Davis was early settlement patterns in the Viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru and his teaching field was 19th century US history. His dissertation was on ÒImages of Conquest in Imaginative Nineteenth-Century North American Literature: Mexico and Peru. He received his PhD degree in 1997 and has taught at UCSC, UCD, UCB, Stanford, San Jose State, California State University East Bay, USF, and the Naval Postgraduate School. He has long-term interests in inter-American relations, social history and revolution, intellectual histories of the Americas, and historiography.

 

This 101 is for history seniors who are specializing in Latin American and Inter-American history. The emphasis of this 101 will be on methods, research strategies, honing thesis questions, outlining, drafting and writing the senior thesis on a subject that treats Latin American and Inter-American themes.   Initially, we will read exemplary portions of some of the classic histories of Latin America with an eye towards both methodological and historiographical questions.  The first three or fours weeks of the course will be devoted to these joint readings and guided group discussions. As we examine these "big" questions, the 101 students will also hone their own research project and devise strategies to complete their research paper in a timely fashion.  As we move into the middle weeks of the semester, the weekly seminar meeting will become secondary to individual research and regular, individual consultations with the instructor.   At the end of the semester the student will submit a journal-size research paper.   Towards the end of the course, we’ll reconvene our class meetings for progress reports and findings.  Get in touch with me if you’re interested in this 101 at louis_segal@hotmail.com.

101 syllabus WIP.doc
Louis Segal
204 Dwinelle
TuTh 2-330
39339
101.013: Research Topics in Modern Latin American and Caribbean HistoryNote new room.Stephanie Ballenger received her Ph.D. in Latin American History from UC Berkeley. Her research interests encompass the intersection of medicine and religion in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, cross-cultural and transnational approaches to health and the politics of health, history and cultures of medicine and the body, and the relationship between the modernization of medical knowledge and the formation of modern national and cultural identities.

This course is a research seminar in which each student will write a original thesis on some aspect of modern Latin American or Caribbean history. (For our purposes, modern will be treated expansively, as encompassing the long nineteenth century [1759-1930] and most of the twentieth.) Because the topics are open and there is a broad range of possibilities, the first part of the course will be dedicated to finding and analyzing a primary source or body of primary source materials out of which a research question will emerge. If you are used to thinking about big questions, this may present a challenge, since this seminar requires you to formulate a research question based on your deep engagement with the source itself. This is one of the ways that professional historians work; it is also one of the ways that original work is done and important contributions to the field are made.

Ballenger
2231 DWINELLE
TuTh 2-330P
101.002: <p>Larissa Kelly is a Ph.D. candidate in Latin American History. Her dissertation focuses on archaeology and the expansion of federal power in nineteenth-century Mexico.</p>

This seminar is focused on researching and writing a 30- to 50-page thesis on an important question in the history of Latin America since 1800. The seminar is open in terms of topics and country of focus: past students have written on everything from the political uses of comics in Mexico and the social aftermath of earthquakes in Guatemala to the political economy of hydropower in Argentina. Starting from your broad interests, you will track down primary sources to work with, examine them in light of prior scholarship, probe them with significant questions of your own, and over a series of drafts, produce a solid and compelling piece of scholarly research. This will be hard work, but also rich and rewarding, if you start strong and work steadily.

Kelly
3104 Dwinelle
TTh 11-12:30P
101.08:

This research seminar is focused on the modern history of Latin America. Students will write a 30- to 50-page paper on some aspect of the social, cultural, political, or economic history of Latin America after 1800. The seminar is open in terms of topics and country of focus. All that is required is to ask interesting questions, pursue the answers rigorously, and make the most use possible (given availability and language skills) of sources in Spanish and Portuguese. The libraries here, especially the Bancroft Library, have an extraordinary collection of material. Starting with your broad interests, you will track down primary materials to work with, examine them in light of prior scholarship, probe them with significant questions of your own, and over a series of drafts, produce
a solid and compelling piece of scholarly research.

This will be hard work. But if you start strong and work steadily, it will also be a rich and rewarding experience. A key part of starting strong is narrowing your topic and identifying your source materials as soon as you can. Everyone signing up for this seminar is therefore required to meet with the instructor (or correspond, if you are not on campus) well before the beginning of spring semester, and hopefully prior to 15 November. Send an email to mark.healey@berkeley.edu or sign up for office hours (Thursdays, 2-4, in the fall).

Healey
TuTh 3:30-5
101.005: Note NEW Instructor! -- Stephanie Ballenger is a doctoral candidate in Latin American history. Her dissertation examines the emergence of modern medical practices and changing constructions of insanity in nineteenth-century Mexico through the prism of Mexico City's insane asylums. She has served as a GSI for History 8A, 8B and 103, PEIS 100 and IAS 102H and 195H, the year-long honors thesis seminar offered by the Department of International and Area Studies.

Thesis seminar for research on Latin American history. Projects on anything ranging from colonial Mexico to modern Brazil are welcome, but we will be particularly interested in social, political and cultural history. Since identifying an interesting question and locating appropriate sources early on is crucial to success with the thesis, all students wishing to take this seminar must contact Ms. Ballenger (jvandsb@comcast.net) before December 1 to discuss possible topics.

Ballenger
104 GPB
WF 10-12
101.007:

Description and course details posted under the Asia listing.

Irschick
TuTh 11-12:30
101.014:

This research seminar offers you the opportunity to build a thoughtful argument around a body of primary sources which you can critically engage, situate and explore in the course of a semester. Throughout the semester, I will ask you to think critically about both theory and method, to carefully consider the angle from which you ask your questions, the sources you choose, and the analytical tools with which you engage your material.

We will examine what we mean by ";culture"; and ";politics";, and the ways in which the two intertwine. I will also encourage you to be creative in how you think about primary sources. We will emphasize the importance of sources that are often marginal to historical inquiry but crucial to the social and political worlds and lives you study. Some examples of sources include, but are not limited to film, photography, public art, popular literature, and material culture. Indeed, there are a number of fascinating papers to be written from the sources you may find in the Bancroft and Doe libraries. Thus, students who have begun research on another topic or period in Latin American history are welcome. However, the scope of this project is challenging, and no student should expect to start from scratch in January. Rather, students interested in a Spring 101 should begin to think about and look into possible research projects early in the Fall, and contact the instructor before the end of the semester at ctrumper@berkeley.edu. Students should also become familiar with the 101 Manual before class begins. Reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is helpful, but not critically necessary.

Trumper
225 Dwinelle
TuTh 9:30-11
101.006:

Details of this course listed under the Europe posting.

Pearson
TuTh 2-3:30
101.01: Beatrice Gurwitz is 4th year history graduate student focusing on 20th century political and cultural history in Argentina. While her background is mostly in modern Argentine, Brazilian, Chilean and Mexican history, students are welcome to write on any country.

Latin American states, nations, and cultures have developed in dynamic relationship with each other since independence from Spain and Portugal in the 19th century. For example, the state and political actors have crafted different ideas of nation at different moments, using various cultural media to promote and diffuse their ideas. Those marginal to dominant ideas of the nation -- women, lower classes, Indigenous peoples, among others -- have also used cultural media as tools to seek inclusion and/or redefine national identity. In the first few weeks, we will discuss how historians have grappled with these and other themes and the kinds of sources they have used to do so. Overall, these initial sessions will help students develop research strategies and methods. They will then be expected to write an extensive research paper (35-50 pages) on a topic of their choosing relating loosely to these themes.

Please note, the class is also open to students interested in studying the colonial period and other themes on Latin America if they have already begun research. All students should consider topics for research and become familiar with the 101 Manual before class begins. Reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is helpful, but not critically necessary.

Gurwitz
321 Haviland
MWF 10-11
101.006: Chad Denton is a PhD candidate in European History at UC Berkeley. His current research is on German requisitions and everyday life in occupied France during World War II.

Description and course details available under Europe listing.

Denton
MW 4-5:30
101.008:

UC-Berkeley is home to one of the world's great research libraries for Mexican history. In addition to deep and varied collections of manuscripts and pictorial materials dating from the sixteenth century to the twentieth century, The Bancroft Library librarians have built an extensive collection of rare books and supporting materials: microfilm of original materials from archives and libraries around the world; and an up-to-date collection of published primary sources, bibliographical materials, and secondary works.

This 101 section offers an opportunity for students with a basic reading knowledge of Spanish and an interest in Latin American history to build a modest, well-contextualized research project in Mexican history from some of these materials. There are many possibilities for good research projects. The Bancroft collections are particularly rich for the colonial period (16th-18th centuries), but the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are amply represented, too, and there are several interesting manuscript sources for Central America and Peru, as well. Students who plan to enroll in this 101 section must consult the instructor with a proposal for research before the end of the fall semester. The challenge is to connect your broad interests and abilities with primary sources that you can master, situate, and interpret in a semester of sustained research and writing. Proposals for research in other areas of Latin American history and religious studies will be considered.

Taylor
3104 Dwinelle
TuTh 9:30-11
101.011:

This course takes a transnational and cross-cultural approach to Latin American history. Rather than focus exclusively on the centers of power and jurisdiction, students will examine the numerous edges and all that traversed official boundaries. This included people (i.e., immigrant groups, slaves, diplomats), things (i.e., primary products, manufactured goods), ideas (i.e., religions, social movements), and power (i.e., imperialism, warfare). Latin America's long and important colonial relationship with Europe will not overshadow the region's numerous links with Africa, Asia and its increasingly powerful neighbors to the north. Class material consists of primary and secondary texts, historiography, literature, iconography and film. Each student will help shape the course, pursue individual interests, teach and learn from peers, and create the ideal conditions to write a substantial history thesis paper.

Read
104 Dwinelle
MWF 1-2
101.017:

See description posted under Comparative listing.

Pearson
205 Wheeler
MW 4-5:30
101.019:

This research seminar will give students the opportunity to explore themes and problems in the connection of Latin America with the Atlantic world from the beginning of that contact in 1492 to the nineteenth century. The integration of this region of the world into Atlantic networks, its role in shaping them and the impact of these interactions on the continent will be explored in the first weeks through readings that we will discuss as a group. The themes we will explore together will include trade, politics, society, environment and culture.

Although it is useful to have a reading knowledge of Spanish, students without this skill will still be able to work on a broad range topics for which there are sources at Bancroft and Doe Libraries that are either translated or produced originally in English. Such topics based on English language sources could include but not be limited to piracy and illegal trade, British relationships with independent Argentina, foreign investment in Mexico, as well as many areas in social history. Other potential topics using Spanish sources could range from migrations to slavery, from environmental change to the diffusion of knowledge.

Students should begin by familiarizing themselves with the History 101 Manual before class begins. In the class we will receive tutorials from Library staff and work together on problems in the interpretation of primary sources, the process of developing a thesis and writing.

Candiani
233 Dwinelle
MWF 12-1
101.006:

See description posted under United States listing.

Henkin
186 Barrows
TuTh 2-3:30
101.009:

UC-Berkeley is home to one of the world?s great research libraries for Mexican history. In addition to deep and varied collections of manuscripts and pictorial materials dating from the sixteenth century to the twentieth century, The Bancroft Library librarians have built an extensive collection of rare books and supporting materials: microfilm of original materials from archives and libraries around the world; and an up-to-date collection of published primary sources, bibliographical materials, and secondary works.

This 101 section offers an opportunity for students with a basic reading knowledge of Spanish and an interest in Latin American history to build a modest, well-contextualized research project in Mexican history from some of these materials. The Bancroft collections are particularly rich for the colonial period (16th-18th centuries), but the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are amply represented, too. There are many possibilities for good research projects, and students who plan to enroll in this 101 section should consult the instructor before the end of the fall semester. The challenge is to connect your broad interests and abilities with primary sources that you can master, situate, and interpret in a semester of sustained research and writing.

Students who have begun research on another topic in Latin American history are welcome to contact me about registering for this 101 section. You will need to demonstrate before the end of the fall semester that you have located usable primary sources on a managable topic. Do not expect to start cold in January.

Taylor
204 Dwinelle
TuTh 9:30-11
101.006: Research Topics in Latin American History

This course is the research seminar for all students working on topics in Latin American history. This course will support students to write a 101 thesis, from the early stages of identifying a research topic and formulating a plan to the writing of the paper itself. Early class sessions will focus on using library resources, such as the Bancroft collections, while later sessions will operate as a workshop for improving thesis drafts.

Patrick Iber
204 DWINELLE
MW 2-4P
39315