Featured Spring Courses

 

The History of Fascism (HIST 158D)
The course surveys all aspects of this movement, from intellectual origins in 19th century bourgeois Europe and World War I, through the extreme experience of WWI, and the question why fascist movements seized power in certain states but not others. We study how fascist regimes, once in power, cultivated popular support and legitimacy; how they developed their own systems of economics, aesthetics, science, and race; and how these regimes shaped the everyday lives of their subjects; and how they radicalized with the onset of war. We conclude by moving closer to the present and asking what of fascism remains in our contemporary world, as memory and practice.

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Vietnam at War (HIST 111D)
This course explores the history of the wars that engulfed Vietnam during the post-WWII era. While focusing on the Second Indochina War (1954-1975), it also examines the history of the First Indochina War (1946-1954) and the Third Indochina War (1978-1980). It will address military, political, and social dynamics of the conflict as well as representatives of the war in film, fiction, and memoirs.

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Gandhi's India: Modern South Asia (HIST 114B)
Here we will deal with the history of South Asia between the coming of the Europeans and the present. It will be organized around a series of contested formulations about the recent South Asian past. One of these problems is: how was India comprehended and manipulated by the Europeans? The second problem is: How was India conquered, by the sword or by the word? The third is: How did Indians resist the British? Finally, how was the voice of women, lower classes, and others expressed and heard?

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US-Latin American Relations (HIST 100E)
In this course, students will examine the history of Latin American relations with the United States from independence to the present. We will consider both the political history of U.S.-Latin American relations (scrutinizing major turning points in foreign policy, occupation and intervention), as well as transnational histories of the region (through topics such as immigration, human rights, the African diaspora, feminism, drugs, and tourism).

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