Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2014
R1B.001: Reading and Composition in History: Religion and Power in Modern American History
  • This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement.
  • This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.

Why does religion have such a prominent place in American politics and society? Compared to other industrialized countries, America is uniquely devout. By virtually every measure—belief in God, church attendance, frequency of prayer, for example—Americans are more religious than people in comparable societies. Religion in the United States is also unusually public. In recent elections, both Democrats and Republicans have publically touted their religious credentials. The American electorate has repeatedly expressed that they would vote for a woman, a Jew, an African American, a lesbian, or a Muslim before they would vote for an atheist. Why does religion occupy such a position of power in the United States? This class will focus on the theme of religious power in American history. We will explore the cultural and political authority of religious leaders from 1860 to the present in order to understand the origins of our contemporary cultural and political landscape. Among the themes we will discuss are: how religious leaders responded to Darwinism and evolution; the debates over religious practice in schools; how the United States transitioned from a “Protestant” country to a “Judeo-Christian” nation; how the government mobilized religion during the Cold War; and how the rise of Evangelicals transformed American politics.

This course satisfies the second half of the university’s reading and composition requirement. We will focus on developing the basic skills of a liberal arts education: reading critically and writing persuasively. The course will also serve as an introduction to historical research and will focus on the components of historical thinking: change over time, causality, context, complexity, and contingency. The first half of the class will require students to write brief essays focused on developing these basic skills. These short writing assignments will ask students to analyze one or more of the assigned texts. In the second half of the course, students will write a longer research essay based on texts of their choosing. At the end of the course students will demonstrate their mastery of the various components of historical thinking in a clearly written essay.

Gene Zubovich
134 DWINELLE
WF 4-530
CCN: 39002
R1B.002: Reading and Composition in History: Ethnicity, Nationalism, and History in Modern East Asia
  • This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement.
  • This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.

This is a reading and composition seminar that examines the interrelated and oft-conflated concepts of ethnicity and nationalism in China, Japan, and Korea for the Twentieth and Twenty-First centuries. What does it mean to belong to one of these groups? How do they relate to each other, or to non-East Asian states and societies? How can their understanding of these terms be historically compared? We will attempt to grapple with these and other abstract questions in a grounded and coherent way, in order to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills. 

This course satisfies the second half of the university’s reading and composition requirement. We will focus on developing the basic skills of a liberal arts education: reading critically and writing persuasively. The course will also serve as an introduction to historical research and will focus on the components of historical thinking: change over time, causality, context, complexity, and contingency. The first half of the class will require students to write brief essays focused on developing these basic skills. These short writing assignments will ask students to analyze one or more of the assigned texts. In the second half of the course, students will write a longer research essay based on texts of their choosing. At the end of the course students will demonstrate their mastery of the various components of historical thinking in a clearly written essay.

Jonathan Tang
233 DWINELLE
TuTh 8-930
CCN: 39003
R1B.003: Reading and Composition in History: A History of Nature: Exploitation, Guardianship, and Awe
  • This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement.
  • This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.
There is a growing global consensus that humans must take better care of the environment.  Rarely, however, do we stop to ponder what we mean by environment or, indeed, nature. In this course we will examine histories of rapacious exploitation, fierce conservation, and contemplative wonderment that gave us the very words we use today. By comparing evolving ideas of what 'nature' meant to different civilizations we will seek to uncover how the natural world has been represented philosophically, culturally, and politically over time.  In addition to providing a conceptual overview of nature in global history, this course will focus on three case studies of 'environmental history' from the United States, China, and Southeast Asia.  In the process, we will discover how our current understanding of the natural world as a global system full of abundant resources worth conserving is the result of many hard fought battles and daring conceptual leaps.  

The aim of the seminar is to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills. The class will be writing intensive and satisfies the second half of the university's reading and composition requirement. In the first half of the semester, students will undertake short writing assignments – responding to the readings or analyzing particular archival sources - to develop their expository and analytic writing skills. In the second half of the semester, students will produce an 8 and a 10 page research paper using several sources and we will critique each others work in class. By the end of the course, students will have learned how to assess source material and use it to construct historical arguments. Through the development of critical reading skills and writing techniques, students will learn to take positions on the broad historical issues addressed in the class.

Matthew Berry
233 DWINELLE
TuTh 930-11A
CCN: 39006
R1B.004: Reading and Composition in History: Ancient Medicine and the Pre-Modern Body: Sex, Drugs and Disease
  • This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement.
  • This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.

This course examines ancient theories and practices of medicine, that is, how Greeks and Romans understood their own bodies and put that knowledge to use. We will investigate ancient views on pathologies, treatment, nutrition, psychology, sexual health, and psychotropic substances. Considerable attention will be given to how perceptions of the body were socially constructed and reinforced norms within these societies, e.g., gender roles, sexual dynamics, and social hierarchies. The course will also cover the reception of ancient medicine and the ultimate shift towards modern medical practices. Students will leave the course with a general understanding of ancient biological knowledge and medical techniques, as well as a familiarity with the most important authorities on these subjects. 

This course satisfies the second half of the university’s reading and composition requirement. We will focus on developing the basic skills of a liberal arts education: reading critically and writing persuasively. The course will also serve as an introduction to historical research and will focus on the components of historical thinking: change over time, causality, context, complexity, and contingency. The first half of the class will require students to write brief essays focused on developing these basic skills. These short writing assignments will ask students to analyze one or more of the assigned texts. In the second half of the course, students will write a longer research essay based on texts of their choosing. At the end of the course students will demonstrate their mastery of the various components of historical thinking in a clearly written essay.

Norman Underwood
TuTh 3-530P
202 Wheeler
CCN: 39009
R1B.005: Crime, Alienation, and the Street: Cities in South Asia
  • This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement.
  • This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.
When Gandhi said that “India does not live in its towns but in its villages,” he was agreeing with the conventional wisdom of his contemporaries, both Indian and British. In this class, we will disregard this view and focus instead on South Asia’s mesmerizing, contentious cities. We will read a love poem about a watermelon; watch movies about gangsters and bored housewives; and encounter shrewd slackers and homicidal, telepathic detectives. Alongside the work of historians and other scholars, these texts will help us think about what makes modernity modern, what makes cities urban, and what makes a colony colonial.
 
The aim of the seminar is to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills. The class will be writing intensive and satisfies the second half of the university's reading and composition requirement. In the first half of the semester, students will undertake short writing assignments – responding to the readings or analyzing particular archival sources - to develop their expository and analytic writing skills. In the second half of the semester, students will produce an 8 and a 10 page research paper using several sources and we will critique each others work in class. By the end of the course, students will have learned how to assess source material and use it to construct historical arguments. Through the development of critical reading skills and writing techniques, students will learn to take positions on the broad historical issues addressed in the class.
David S. Boyk
186 BARROWS
WF 4-530P
CCN: 39012
R1B.006: The Kind of Problem a City Is: Premodern Urban Growth and Development
  • This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement.
  • This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.

Early urban centers were crucial to the creation and dissemination of cultural, political, religious, and socioeconomic developments.   We will look at primary and secondary source materials on early urban centers around the world as we consider questions such as:   what criteria do we use to determine what a “city” is, what are urbanism and urbanization and how do they differ, how do we interpret the data of early sources which often do not collect data directly relevant to the questions modern historians ask.  We will discuss what tools and methodologies enable us to interpret available data on patterns of development and socialization, economic activity, crime, disease, resource management, and systems of administration and control.  A comparative perspective is encouraged.

The aim of the seminar is to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills. The class will be writing intensive and satisfies the second half of the university's reading and composition requirement. In the first half of the semester, students will undertake short writing assignments – responding to the readings or analyzing particular archival sources - to develop their expository and analytic writing skills. In the second half of the semester, students will produce an 8 and a 10 page research paper using several sources and we will critique each others work in class. By the end of the course, students will have learned how to assess source material and use it to construct historical arguments. Through the development of critical reading skills and writing techniques, students will learn to take positions on the broad historical issues addressed in the class.

Amanda D Buster
TuTh 8-9:30
222 WHEELER
CCN: 39014
2: Ancient Empires

At the dawn of the first millennium, nearly one half of the world’s population lived within one of two extensive imperial systems, the Roman empire in the Mediterranean basin and the Han empire in East Asia (ruling roughly the territory of today’s China).  This course examines these two durable and far-flung empires in comparative perspective, and also considers the nature of empire as a particular type of polity in the premodern world.  Structurally similar in some ways but strikingly different in others, the Roman and Han empires form an ideal subject for sustained, comparative analysis.  Central themes include warfare and conquest; economics, finance, and the distribution of resources; administration, governance, and strategies of rule; relations between center and periphery; methods of acquiring and perpetuating high status and the making of social orders; imperial time and space; culture and cultural change; imperial literatures and religions; and the aftermath and legacies of these two world empires.  Lectures will provide an essential historical narrative as well as interpretations of central problems, while readings in primary sources will give students an opportunity in discussion sections to grapple with some of the evidence on which such narratives and interpretations are based. 

Requirements include attendance at weekly discussion section; one short paper (4-5 pp.); one midterm exam; one term paper (10-12 pp.); and a final exam.

Carlos F. Noreña, Michael Nylan
106 STANLEY
TuTh 11-1230P
CCN: 39015
4A: Origins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World

This course offers an introductory survey of the history of the ancient Mediterranean world, from the rise of city states in Mesopotamia circa 3000 BC to the emergence of the Byzantine Empire in the sixth century AD.  The course has three main foci.  The first is to survey the major events and developments in the social, economic, and political history of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome.   The second focus is to consider, very much along the way, the origins and development in the ancient world of ideas, practices, and institutions that have had an enduring influence on the development of western civilization.  These will include the emergence of cities, kingship, organized religion, and written law in the Near East and Mesopotamia; dynastic rule and priestly power in Egypt; tyranny, democracy, citizenship, imperialism, colonization, slavery, freedom, religious persecution and martyrdom in the Greek and Roman worlds.  The third focus will be the Mediterranean itself, for it was on and around its deep waters that all of these developments took place, and it left on each of them its distinctive mark.

Lectures and textbook readings will provide an essential historical narrative as well as interpretations of central problems. Primary source readings (including epic poetry, songs of labor and lamentation, political propaganda, narrative history, public documents, and biography) will give students an opportunity in discussion sections to grapple with some of the evidence on which our narratives and interpretations are based.  There will be two short papers, three map quizzes, a midterm, and a cumulative final exam. Regular attendance and participation in discussion section is required.

Emily Mackil
50 BIRGE
TuTh 930-11A
CCN: 39036
4B: Medieval Europe

A saint picked up worms from the road to keep them safe from harm. A ruler executed 4500 prisoners of war. Jerusalem was conquered in a bloodbath. Flagellants bloodied their own bodies to prepare for the Millennium. Such incidents are all representative of the middle ages. The period is puzzling, contradictory, difficult, and endlessly fascinating. It is also profoundly important, because its 1000 years saw the development of principles and institutions fundamental to later European, American, and Latin American societies. We will begin with the fall of the Roman Empire and then follow the history of one particular people (the Franks) whose own empire gave Europe a lasting belief in its historical destiny. We will then discuss the First Crusade, changing expressions of religious belief and practice (including heresy and the church's responses to it), the rise of states, the appearance of popular rebellion, and the literary culture of the aristocracy. A good deal of attention is also given to the position of women in society and the distinctive social values and religious piety that grew out of it. Other than a good, dense textbook, readings are entirely translated primary sources – generally whole works rather than excerpted snippets.  

Geoffrey Koziol
101 BARKER
TuTh 11-1230
CCN: 39015
5: European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present

This course introduces students to European history from around 1500 to the present as an aspect of global history. During this period, a small, poor, and fragmented outcropping of Asia became a world civilization, whose political, cultural, and economic power touched the four corners of the world. Our course will ask how and why this happened. How, in other words, did "modernity" become "western," for better and worse? As we cover this half-millennium, we will look at major landmarks in European cultural, intellectual, social, political, and economic development as they played out on a local and on a global scale: the Renaissance, the epochal expansion of Europe into the new world, the break-up of Latin Christianity into the competing religious communities, the construction of the modern state, the formation of overseas empires and the coming of capitalism, the Scientific Revolution, the French Revolution, liberalism and the industrial revolution, socialism and the rise of labor, modern colonialism, the world wars, communism and capitalism, decolonization, and the Cold War and the European Union. Our readings will range from learned treatises in religion and classics in political theory to novels and plays and documents from the past, and perhaps a good history book or two. There will probably be no textbook. Work in sections focuses on discussions of the readings and on the improvement of writing skills. Three hours of lecture and two hours of section (required) per week.

Thomas W. Laqueur
2060 VALLEY LSB
TuTh 1230-2P
CCN: 39063
5: European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present

This course introduces students to the history of Europe since the late Renaissance, surveying the landmark events, dates, people, and historical processes of European history over the last half-millennium.  We begin in 1492 with the European conquest of the New World and the development of the “new monarchies” in Europe, and move rapidly through the Protestant and Catholic Reformations and Religious Wars, the development of strong and increasingly national states, the intellectual revolutions in science and philosophy, the French Revolution, industrialization, liberalism and socialism, colonial empires, the world wars of the 20th century, the Cold War, decolonization, and the formation of the European Union.  Throughout the course, we will focus on the reading and interpretation of primary sources, using an array of documents to introduce students to the sources of historical knowledge and the interpretive practices of historical thinking  – from theological tracts to accounts of conquest, from philosophical texts to political treatises, from descriptions of social conditions to speeches, memoirs, letters, and visual artifacts.  Themes on which we shall focus include the changing nature of political authority and practices and the changing expressions of collective identities in Europe.  Requirements include attendance at two weekly lectures and a two-hour section meeting devoted to discussing primary sources, several short papers, a midterm, and a final.  

Peter Sahlins
120 LATIMER
TuTh 2-330P
CCN: 39033
6A: History of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest

Origins to the Mongol Conquest. The history of China from its beginnings to the destruction of the Song Dynasty by the Mongols in the 13th century. Topics to be covered include the emergence of Chinese civilization, the Chinese language, early philosophy, the creation of the first empire, Buddhism and religious Daoism, the Silk Road, ethnicity, the socioeconomic revolution of the 10th to 12th centuries, lyric poetry, and painting and calligraphy.

Nicolas Tackett
155 Donner Lab
TuTh 1230-2P
CCN: 39099
6B: Introduction to Chinese History from the Mongols to Mao

This survey of early modern and modern Chinese history covers the rise and fall of three major conquest dynasties (the Mongol Yuan, the Chinese Ming, and the Manchu Qing), the ultimate collapse of the dynastic system, and the emergence of the nation-state in the twentieth century (first under the Nationalist Party, then under the Communist Party). Along the way, we will examine encounters between the latter territorial empires and the maritime empires of the West, increasing commercialization and urbanization, and the impact of various social revolutions. Students will be required to attend lectures, take part in discussion sessions, and read up to 150 pages each week in a variety of materials, with a strong emphasis on primary sources in English translation. Graded assignments will include weekly reading responses, active participation in discussion, two short papers, and two exams. There are no prerequisites.

Alexander C. Cook
126 BARROWS
TuTh 930-11A
CCN: 39063
7A: The United States from Settlement to Civil War

This course introduces the history of the lands that became the United States, from antiquity through the Civil War.  We will focus on interactions among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans on the North American continent; the social, political, and environmental changes wrought by those interactions; the development of colonial societies and the formation of the United States; the spread of new ideas and cultural institutions; the clash of competing claims about power, rights, religious obligation, and the good life.

Requirements include active participation in weekly discussion sections, two in-class quizzes, two take-home essays, and a final examination.

David Henkin
2050 VALLEY LSB
TuTh 2-330P
CCN: 39114
7B: The United States Since the Civil War - Session C

This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Readings, lectures, films, discussions, papers, and exams will all familiarize students with the ways historians look at the past, think about evidence, and write clearly about complex relationships of cause and effect. By exploring Reconstruction, the Indian Wars, Jim Crow segregation, changing immigration policies, and the suffrage and civil rights movements, the course will explore changing, overlapping, and stratified processes of inclusion and exclusion that have redefined categories of whiteness, citizenship, and American identity. We will also analyze how industrialization, immigration, westward expansion, and the increasing intervention of state and federal governments illuminates the causes and consequences of the United States’ rapid and transformative economic growth in the second half of the nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries. Ultimately, social and political movements emerged to address the uneven distribution of economic, environmental, and social burdens created by this economic expansion. Students will study the ways that consumer culture, new media, and suburbanization influenced American popular attitudes and perceptions of the political process, the economy, the environment, and a variety of social movements. This course will finish by charting the origins, influence, and legacies of the Cold War, de-industrialization, and Neoliberalism. Students must attend lecture and discussion and complete assigned readings, a research essay, a midterm exam, and a final exam. 

Robert N. Chester
101 LSA
MWTh 10-12P
CCN: 48905
7B: The United States from Civil War to Present

This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. It is also an introduction to the ways historians look at the past and think about evidence. Rather than a matter of memorizing names and dates, history is about framing the truest and most complete stories we can to explain wide ranges of human experience. Although this course will touch on many subjects, it will track three main narrative lines. One, from the abolition of slavery to the election of Obama, will trace changing regulations of and ideas about race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and other cultural and political markers of identity. The second, the rise and fall of industrial society, will examine major economic transitions, as the fulcrum of U.S. economic life shifted from agriculture to industry and then to services. The third, from Sand Creek and Little Bighorn to 9-11 and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, will focus on the rise and uses of American power in the world. Lectures, readings, discussions, films, and writing assignments (and, yes, midterm and final exams) will stress various parts of these stories and also sharpen critical reading, interpretation, research, and writing skills.

Syll, spring 2014.pdf
Robin L. Einhorn
WHEELER AUD
MWF 11-12P
CCN: 39084
8A: Becoming Latin America, 1492 to 1824

This course covers the history of Latin America from the time of Columbus to around 1870. It thus reckons with almost four centuries of encounter, colonization, accommodation, and struggle that frame the ways that Latin America was becoming Latin American. The approach is a blend of narratives (of conquest, reform, independence) and eight themes: land, labor, and demography; race and ethnicity; religion; Church and Crown; trade and global economic systems; gender and family; urban life and culture; and identity (creole, indigenous, mestizo). Each theme will be taken up twice: once for the period roughly 1550-1700, and once for the period roughly 1700 to 1810. Lectures and a mix of secondary and primary source readings and images produced during the colonial period serve as points of entry for discussion in section meetings. Final grades are based on two short papers, a mid-term exam, a final exam, and participation in section meetings.

Margaret Chowning
180 TAN
TuTh 330-5P
CCN: 39168
8B: Modern Latin America
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
The Staff
150 GSPP
MWF 3-4P
CCN: 39171
10: African History
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
The Staff
160 DWINELLE
MWF 12-1P
CCN: 39186
11: India
  • This course has been cancelled.
The Staff
223 Dwinelle
MWF 10-11A
CCN: 39183
12: The Middle East

The current popular uprisings in the Middle East underscore the dynamism and vitality of a region that has played a central role in human history since ancient times. This course introduces students to the major historical developments in this region from the rise of Islam to the present. It is designed to help you contextualize current developments and to give you the tools to educate yourself on your own. It also prepares you for more advanced courses in the Dept. of History (such as 109C) or courses in other departments that require some background in the history of the Middle East. There are two other benefits to this course. First, it explores what it means to do history by explicitly referring to various approaches and methodologies used to construct narratives about change over time. Second, the cultivation of a historical sensibility is backed up by training in critical thinking, writing, and thematic synthesis -skills that you will need regardless of career path.

Themes: The diverse peoples of Southwest Asia/North Africa (a region recently labeled "The Middle East") have a rich and remarkable history. They established some of the earliest centers of agriculture-based civilizations and urban life, carried the messages of the world's three monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity and Islam), and served as the economic and cultural middlemen of the world system during the medieval and early modern periods. The first part of this course provides a brief outline of these and other themes up to the Seventeenth Century. The second part focuses on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, an era of intense social, economic and cultural transformation that led to the demise of the Ottoman and other empires and the emergence of a new state system, most of it under the colonial domination of Britain and France. The remainder of the course (Parts III, IV) is devoted to an exploration of the forces that have shaped the Middle East during the Twentieth Century such as the colonial encounter and rise of nationalist movements, the discovery of oil, regional conflicts and the Cold War, the rise of political Islam, and U.S. military intervention. Throughout, the major themes will be illustrated through case studies of specific countries as well as through the study of the causes and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian Revolution, and the Gulf Wars.

Requirements: Mid-term and final exams, brief writing assignments, attending lectures, and participation in discussion sections.

12 Syllabus 2014.pdf
Thomas W. Hill
3106 Etcheverry
MWF 12-1P
CCN: 39192
14: Introduction to the History of Japan

This course is a brisk but intense introduction to the nearly two millennia of recorded Japanese history. As a survey, the course gives attention to broad themes and problems in Japan's political, social and cultural/intellectual history. Topics include the interplay of national and local identities in shaping Japan's interaction with the Asian continent and the Western world, and the relation of past to present in modern times. As fas as possible readings are taken from primary sources, including religious writings, diaries, poetry, novels, political tracts, etc. These are supplemented by selected secondary treatments and occasional films.

Andrew E. Barshay
213 Wheeler
TuTh 330-5P
CCN: 39198
24: The Free Speech Movement and the 1960s

We will discuss the historical origins, development, meanings, and legacy of Berkeley's Free Speech Movement. Several key issues will guide our investigation: relevant historical notions of free speech and interrelated free speech practices; the history of key student movements at Berkeley and other colleges/universities, in the US and beyond; and, why, how, and with what consequences Berkeley's Free Speech Movement evolved as it did.  

Waldo E. Martin, Jr. is the Alexander F. and May T. Morrison Professor of American History and Citizenship at Berkeley. His most recent book, co-authored with Joshua Bloom, is Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party (2013). He's also the author of "Holding One Another: Mario Savio and the Freedom Struggle in Mississippi and Berkeley," in Cohen and Zelnik, The Free Speech Movement (2002).

Waldo E. Martin
TBA
TBA
24: A Superpower Transformed: History, Strategy, and American Foreign Policy in the 1970s

The United States began the 1970s mired in the Vietnam War and ended it waylaid by oil crises, economic disarray, and resurgent Cold War hostilities. For historians and others, the 1970s have long been a forgotten—and forgettable—decade. This seminar suggests a different perspective. The 1970s, students will learn, brought great changes, especially for the role of the United States in the world. The decade forced Americans to confront the stirrings of globalization, and it encouraged them to contemplate the possibilities of universal human rights—as both an ideology and a foreign-policy goal. While the Cold War still endured, the maligned 1970s forged new and distinctive patterns of "post-Cold War" politics, some of which endure through to the present day. Students will encounter the 1970s through a book manuscript that Professor Sargent is currently preparing for publication. Besides engaging the history and historiography of the 1970s, the seminar will also give students the opportunity to see how a historian goes about the work of writing a book manuscript. Reading will comprise approximately one chapter per week plus one or two historical documents. This is a Course Threads Theme Seminar. This seminar is part of the Food for Thought Seminar Series.

Daniel Sargent
3104 Dwinelle
F 3-4P
CCN: 39213
24: Chinese Film on Contemporary Issues

This seminar will examine Chinese films (documentaries, semi-autobiographical ruminations, and feature films) that speak to contemporary political concerns.
The movies of Jia Zhangke will be featured prominently, along with the early films of Zhang Yimou, and more recent blockbusters (e.g. "Confucius" with Chow Yun-fat). Taiwanese movies will be featured alongside Chinese movies. If this seminar is over-subscribed, we will depend upon instructor approval, but otherwise the course is open. This seminar is a Berkeley Arts Seminar. Admission to the on-campus arts events included in this course will be provided at no cost to students.

Michael Nylan
3205 Dwinelle
W 11-12P
CCN: 39222
30: Science and Society

Science as we know is the product of a historical process. This course examines the relationship of science and society from antiquity to the present. We will trace theories and thoughts about the natural world through ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the modern era. During the course, we will explore the development of the concept of science as practiced and understood in our culture today, the historical role of science, and its relationship with society, culture, politics, economy, religion, and the environment through lectures, readings, and discussions.

Rebecca Kaplan
160 Dwinelle
MWF 2-3P
CCN: 39225
39P: Sex, Sexuality and Society

This course will explore, in historical perspective, why and how the nature of sexual difference, the control of reproduction, and the policing and regulation of sexual desires, practices and pleasures have loomed so large in the organization of society and culture. We will discuss the history of foundational concepts—sex, sexuality, desire, —as well as more specific topics: the history of erotic literature and art, east and west; the regulation of specific practices and norms—homosexuality, auto-eroticism, birth control, abortion, age of consent; the origins of modern sexual identities (LGBT); the role of science and medicine in the history of sex, sexuality and society. Many weeks we will have a guest for our second session.

Thomas W. Laqueur
3205 Dwinelle
TuTh 12-2
CCN: 39242
39Q: Education in Society: Universities as Agents of Change, Ivory Towers, or Knowledge Factories

 

From their medieval origins to the present, universities have been among the most admired and most criticized institutions. What are their functions? What is the role of higher education and free speech on campus and in society? Who should universities serve? Do they increase social mobility or social stratification? To what uses should they put the knowledge they create? How should they interact with government agencies and corporations? Through discussions of readings, this seminar will explore the structures and functions of universities, their multiple and changing roles in society, and the reasons why they have often become the battlegrounds for new ideas about the purposes of education, the uses of knowledge, and the future directions of society.

 

Judith Brown
3205 Dwinelle
MW 12-2P
CCN: 40092
84: The Origins of Historical Writing in the Ancient West

The first historians of western civilization emerged in Israel, Greece, and Rome in the first millennium BC. They preserved information about the great empires, major personalities, and crucial events now lost to us; they established our major narratives of archetypal events such as the battle of Marathon, the foundation of Rome, and the spread of Christianity; and they have all been accused repeatedly of gross dishonesty in their portrayal of events. They are worthy of the attention of all students of both ancient history and historical writing.This course will explore how these historians constructed and presented their narratives. 

David J. DeVore
3205 DWINELLE
F 10-12P
CCN: 39243
84P: Sophomore Seminar: "American High: Years of Confidence and Anxiety, 1950-1964"

This seminar will meet the entire semester.

We will view and discuss movies made during these years in order to help us understand the era. In addition, we will make use of a reader of more conventional documents.  This might help us address the question, “What are the advantages and shortcomings of using movies for an understanding of the era in which they were made? Can movies give us a sense of what it was like to be alive in such times?”

Students will be asked to write a one paragraph response to each of the movies, and they will also be called upon to submit a 10 page interpretive essay at the end of the course.  This course will be linked to the “On the Same Page” program.  Professor Robert Cohen, the featured speaker, will come to one of our meetings and help us discuss the topic, Mario Savio in the ‘50s.

This seminar is part of the On the Same Page initiative. 

Samuel Haber is an Emeritus Professor of History at UC Berkeley.

Samuel Haber
214 HAVILAND
W 2-5P
CCN: 39222
N100: Special Topics in History: Short Course - "Slavery in the Ancient Greek and Roman World" Session A
The institution of slavery was deeply embedded in the political, legal, social, economic and cultural framework of the ancient Greek and Roman world.  Among societies that have tolerated or supported the domination and ownership of human beings by other human beings, ancient Greece and Rome stand out as two of the few that can properly be considered “slave societies.”  In order to examine the impact of slavery on state and society in the ancient Greek and Roman, world we will consider a wide range of topics including the origins and maintenance of the slave system, slave labor, family life, resistance and slave rebellions, manumission and freedom, and Greek and Roman ideas about slavery.  Discussion of slavery in the antebellum U.S. South will help us to place ancient slavery in a broad historical and comparative perspective.
 
This is a two-unit course.  There are no prerequisites
 
Carlos F. Noreña
220 Wheeler
TuTh 4-6P
CCN: 48929
N100: Special Topics in History: Short Course - "Energy: An American History" Session D

This course will examine how the predominant sources of energy and how the uses of those different types of energy changed over time and across American geographies. We will start by analyzing the diets of hunter-gatherer societies, as well as the domestication of fire, plants, and animals. We will explore the origins and consequences of the dam building frenzy in the first half of the twentieth century, the expansion of the fossil fuel economy, and the social history of electricity and automobiles and their impacts on consumer culture. We will also analyze the ways that WWII and the Cold War created the context for the development of nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants and the controversies and legacies these industries have generated. Finally, we will examine how increased consumption of energies helped contribute to the rise of current controversies over fracking, climate change, and renewable energy projects.

Energy A History-1.pdf
Robert N. Chester
MW 8-10A
CCN: 49035
100AC: Special Topics in the History of the United States
What is capitalism? And when did it come to characterize the American economy? This course will explore the economic history of the United States, from the colonial period to the present. We will analyze the dramatic changes that catapulted a chain of colonies from the fringe of the global economy to its center. As the semester progresses, we will seek out the sources of this dramatic transformation, exploring a variety of overlapping and sometimes conflicting explanations for the coming of capitalism. Is this primarily a story about ideas and economic outlook? Is it about entrepreneurship and innovation? Or about exploitation and expropriation? What role did the government play? What role the individual?
 
Major themes will include the rise of the factory system, slavery and emancipation, technological innovation, the development of banking and finance, and economic inequality. Rarely was the “invisible hand” colorblind or gender neutral. We will examine capitalism both from above and from below, seeking to understand the causes and consequences of economic change for different groups of Americans. We will debate the role of famous businessmen and inventors, but we will also look at the ways largely forgotten workmen, mothers, and even slaves shaped the course of American economic development.
 
Caitlin Rosenthal studies American economic history. Her current book project, From Slavery to Scientific Management, explores the influence of slave plantations on the development of business practices, particularly accounting and commercial calculation. The project draws on her doctoral dissertation, which won the 2013 Krooss prize for the best dissertation in business history. Prior to joining the faculty at UC Berkeley she was the Harvard-Newcomen Fellow at Harvard Business School.
Caitlin C. Rosenthal
155 KROEBER
TuTh 11-1230P
CCN: 39279
100AP: Special Topics in Ancient History: Augustine's City of God

This course will focus on Augustine’s City of God.  A classic of “Western Civilization” as well as “Christianity,” this is a challenging text. We will use it as a guide-line to investigate “on the ground” how Augustine saw the transformation of the later Roman empire into a Christian empire and how he himself contributed to that transformation. We want to investigate how Christianity changes membership in the ancient city, what it meant for Augustine to be a Christian “citizen,” and how he thought about Roman history. In doing all this we will address recent scholarship positing (once more) the decline of the Roman Empire.

Requirements are: one final seminar paper and one in class book review.

Susanna Elm
78 Barrows
TuTh 930-11A
CCN: 39287
100D: Special Topics in the History of the United States
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
David Montejano
160 Dwinelle
TuTh 330-5P
CCN: 39291
100E.001: Cuba in World History

This course surveys Cuban history, culture, and politics from the fifteenth century to the present.  We will examine both the outsized role the island has played in world history and the dramatic ways world history has refracted through the island’s turbulent past.  Over this long timespan, Cuba has had relationships of colonial status with Spain, a client role with the United States, and dependency with the Soviet Union.  At the same time, the island has played a critical part in global flows of capital, goods, people, and ideas that have profoundly altered world politics, economics, demographics, and cultures.  How has Cuban history and culture been shaped by its unique position in global geopolitics, at the crossroads of Europe, the Americas, and Africa?  How have inhabitants of Cuba struggled against recurring and ongoing relationships of colonialism and dependency with foreign powers? And finally, how have inhabitants of Cuba defined what it means to be Cuban both because of and in spite of these global forces?  In answering these questions, we will draw on a wide array of texts (historians’ interpretations, contemporary accounts, speeches, literature, art, music, dance, and film) from long before the famous Revolution of 1959 to well after.  Our goal will be to interrogate the broad sweep of Cuba’s past and the ongoing and fiercely contested process of its interpretation.

Elena A. Schneider
110 WHEELER
TuTh 930-11A
CCN: 39298
100E.002: Latin America and the World

If anything knits together the diverse region known as Latin America, it is a shared experience of imperialism and neo-imperialism on the world stage. This course will examine the ways in which the nations of Latin America have managed that fate: resisting it, embracing it, and trying to reform it. We will examine cases of clear interventions by foreign empires, from France in nineteenth-century Mexico to the U.S. in Central America and Chile in the late twentieth. But we will also look at more subtle forms of economic and cultural influence, and consider the ways that Latin American nations from Cuba to Costa Rica tried to limit the power of the U.S. and project their own influence. We will end with a discussion of transnational issues in contemporary Latin America, including the drugs trade. Class will feature frequent debates with student participation.

Patrick Iber
88 Dwinelle
MWF 11-12P
CCN: 40095
100H: Special Topics in African History
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Tabitha Kanogo
103 Moffitt
TuTh 2-330P
CCN: 39294
100H: A Short History of New Social Agents in Post-Cold War Africa

At the end of the Cold War in 1989, Francis Fukuyama declared “the end of history”, asserting the ideological triumph of Western liberal democracy over all other political forms. Has history ended? Nearly 25 years later, it appears that the imposition of the neo-liberal market around the world has not eliminated, but expanded forms of political contestation. This is especially true of Africa.

This course begins by problematizing Fukuyama’s claim. We will do this by exploring the multiple, nonlinear, interconnected paths of new social agents, who have come into being against the backdrop of intensified global integration and capitalist development. Since the end of the Cold War, parts of Africa have experienced the dissolution of previously functioning local and vernacular economies, precipitating mass migrations both within and across national borders. Likewise, many of Africa’s urban metropolises have seen the proliferation of slums due to de-industrialization, jobless growth, and the increasing inaccessibility of formal economic opportunities. Such major historical and geographical changes have produced various forms of politics and social actors capable of contesting the status quo.

The course, therefore, seeks to explore the living history of everyday agency and contestation in Africa, which offer a distinct challenge to Fukuyama’s claim. We will focus on non-state social actors across the continent –social movements, community organizations, millenarian movements, youth groups, “terrorist” groups, pirates, gangs and mobs as well as NGOs and aid organizations – that powerfully articulate local needs. Discussions will seek to reveal the everyday realities of Africans in conditions of poverty, from which such actors often emerge. We will explore the threats social agents face and present in terms of political and human security – and how these in turn, provide challenges to governance, and the broader global political economy. Primary topics will include struggles over land and natural resources; labor and livelihoods; ethnicity and religion; urban and rural social movements; and other challenges to the state and market that vividly illustrate the rich contemporary history of Africa.

 
Leopold Podlashuc
100 WHEELER
MWF 3-4P
CCN: 40104
100M: The History of Modern Israel, 1882 - Present

This course will offer an interdisciplinary introduction to the history of the modern state of Israel, beginning with the pre-state origins of Jewish nationalism in the late nineteenth century and concluding in the present. The class will consider, among other topics, the history of Zionism, proto-Zionist activity, the development of modern Hebrew culture, Jewish-Arab relationships prior and after the establishment of Israel, religion and ethnicity in Israel, and historical debates in Israeli politics, law and constitutionalism. This foundational course will also feature guest lectures by a number of Berkeley faculty from a variety of disciplines, who will provide specialist perspectives on key topics.

Carlos F. Noreña
213 WHEELER
MW 4- 5:30P
CCN: 39296
100U.001: Ideas of Sexuality. From Antiquity to the Present

In this introduction to the critical study of sexuality, we will examine the ways in which notions of body, gender, and sexuality have been organized from Antiquity to the present. Focusing on the geographical regions of Europe and the United States, we will use history, literature, and theory to deepen our understanding of these transformations.

The course will follow a chronological order with emphasis on five historical time-periods: Antiquity, Middle Ages, Enlightenment, 19th century and 20th century. In these time-periods, we will pay special attention to political, religious, intellectual, medical, and social factors. We will examine the emergence, transformation, and contestation of various sexual categories and gender relations: the cultural norms of heterosexuality, gender performance, bodily perceptions, as well as how the carnevalesque has been used to create and disturb norms of gender and sexuality.

By focusing our attention on the challenged and changing meanings of sexuality, this course aims to strengthen your skills of critical analysis.

We also expect to have lots of fun!

Monica Libell
200 Wheeler
MW 4-530P
CCN: 39299
100U.002: Big History
A growing body of interdisciplinary scholarly work has begun to attempt an integrated history of the universe from the Big Bang to the 21st century. Varieties of “big history” or deep history” have been especially influential among scholars working across the humanities and various physical sciences. Since the physical sciences have generally devoted themselves to the non-human past, and since most historians have confined themselves to the study of human events, we will be paying special attention to the difficulties that the interaction of human and natural environments have posed for theory and research. This course will introduce students to current debates by tracing the intellectual history of “big history” from the heyday of Universal History in the 18th and 19th centuries to its newfound popularity today. The course will be divided between lecture and class discussion of weekly materials. Students will be responsible for discussions, two brief papers, and a final blue-book exam.
Kerwin L. Klein
110 WHEELER
TuTh 1230-2P
CCN: 40098
100U.003: Frontier History
From Hadrian's Wall and the Roman limites, to the American West in the 19th c., to contemporary Chinese jurisdictional claims in the South China Sea, borders and frontiers are universal phenomena best understood from a broadly comparative perspective. On the basis of case examples from all regions and time periods, this course will explore a variety of related topics: territorialization as a historical process; frontier law; the conflicting military and political needs on the frontier; representations of the frontier in literature; the nature of borderland societies; theories and approaches used historically to legitimate boundaries and territorial claims (from natural border theories to modern international law); etc. Course requirements: occasional quizzes (to encourage keeping up with readings & lectures), as well as weekly assignments and presentations that build up to a final project/paper organized around a specific case study. Group collaboration will be encouraged. We will have discussions on Fridays..
Nicolas Tackett
3205 Dwinelle
MWF 9-10A
CCN: 40101
104: The Craft of History

History 104 is a course designed for history majors, or prospective majors, to master the skills necessary to succeed in their chosen discipline and to enhance their understanding of the nature of historical inquiry.   By taking this course, you will improve your ability to meet the challenges of upper level history courses and prepare yourself for the advanced research and writing expected in History 103 and 101, the senior honors thesis sequence.   History 104 is taught in one lecture and two section meetings per week, emphasizing hands-on learning. There will be no exams, and the reading assignments are relatively light, in order to give you time to work with the professor and GSIs on asking historical questions, finding research topics, locating and organizing primary and secondary source materials, developing an argument, experimenting with various forms of writing, and crafting a polished essay.  Grading will be based on section participation and a series of writing assignments building toward a 10-12 page original historical essay.

Mark A. Peterson
101 MOFFITT
Tu 3:30-5:00P
CCN: 39500
106A: The Roman Republic

“I found Rome city of brick and left it a city of marble,” boasted the first Roman emperor, Augustus. It was to be the end of the Republic. In this class, we shall investigate how Rome grew from a village of farmers into an Empire of provinces between the eighth and first centuries BCE, but not without destroying its beloved Republic in civil war. The lecture course familiarizes students with Rome’s expansionist success into an empire, first within Italy, and later across Europe and throughout the Mediterranean. Within this narrative framework, we pay close attention to the political, economic, social, and culture impact Rome had on its territories, but also the influence foreign people, especially Greeks, had on Roman daily life. We will want to explore excitingly new models of power, for cities, kings, usurpers, and pirates and investigate more closely the dealings of ordinary people and their lived, albeit anonymous, experience – that is, history from the top down and history from the bottom up.

 

In addition to attendance and participation, there will be short written assignments, a midterm, and a final.

Jelle Stoop
141 MCCONE
MWF 12-1P
CCN: 39501
N106B: The Roman Empire - Session A

This course offers an introduction to the history of the Roman empire, from the advent of monarchy in Rome in the first century BC to the breakdown of central state authority in the fifth century AD.  Major themes include the overlapping networks of social power in the Roman empire (institutional and personal); the unity and diversity of Roman imperial culture; the changing relationship between state and society; the political economy of the Roman empire; and the geography and ecology of the Mediterranean world.  Lectures will provide an essential historical narrative and interpretations of central problems in Roman imperial history, and discussion sections will give students an opportunity to engage with key texts from or about the Roman empire, from Tacitus to Gibbon.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

Carlos F. Noreña
122 Wheeler
TuWTh 1-330P
CCN: 48930
N109C: The Modern Middle East from the 18th Century to the Present - Session D

This course surveys the key processes, events and personalities that have shaped the societies, states and economies of the Middle East since the 18th century. It is designed to help contextualize current developments, to identify various interpretative frameworks for approaching history in general and for understanding the Middle East in particular, and to acquaint students with a variety of useful sources ranging from film to specialized academic articles. Students are expected to attend every class to hear the lecture, ask questions and participate in discussion.

The Staff
234 Dwinelle
MTuWTh 10-12P
CCN: 48935
109C: The Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
The Staff
3106 ETCHEVERRY
MWF 9-10A
CCN: 39501
111C: Political and Cultural History of Vietnam

This course provides an introduction to Vietnamese history from the mythic origins of the Vietnamese people to the end of the Vietnam War in 1975. Special emphasis will be placed on "modern" developments from the late 18th century. Topics include Sino-Vietnamese political and cultural relations; the status of Vietnamese women; the history of Vietnamese Buddhism, Confucianism and Catholicism; the rise and fall of the Ly, Tran, Ho, and Le dynasties; the Nguyen/Trinh Wars and the origins of Southern Vietnam; the Tay Son Rebellion; the emergence of the Nguyen Dynasty, French imperialism and colonial conquest; the development of colonial capitalism; the growth of anti-colonialism, radicalism, nationalism, and communism; World War II and Japanese Occupation; the August Revolution; the first Indochina War, Dien Bien Phu and the Geneva Accords; the formation of separate post-colonial states in northern and southern Vietnam; American Intervention and the Second Indochina War. Readings will be drawn from a range of secondary scholarship and primary historical documents as well as from literature, memoirs and poetry.

Peter B. Zinoman
30 Wheeler
TuTh 930-11A
CCN: 39503
111C: Political and Cultural History of Vietnam
  • A complete description is forthcoming. Please check back.
Alec G. Holcombe
88 DWINELLE
MWF 3-4PM
CCN: 39507